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Article

Understanding the Deterioration of Gait, Postural Control, Lower Limb Strength and Perceived Fatigue Across the Disability Spectrum of People with Multiple Sclerosis

1
Department of Sports Science, Miguel Hernández University of Elche, 03202 Elche, Spain
2
Department of Clinical Medicine, Miguel Hernández University of Elche, 03550 San Juan de Alicante, Spain
3
Department of Neurology, University General Hospital of Alicante, 03010 Alicante, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(5), 1385; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051385
Received: 25 March 2020 / Revised: 5 May 2020 / Accepted: 6 May 2020 / Published: 8 May 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Multiple Sclerosis)
Disability progression is a prominent feature of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, little is known about the extent to which physical condition parameters and perceived fatigue evolve during the disease. We analyzed how strength, balance, core stability and perceived fatigue differ among different cohorts of people with MS (PwMS) with different disability degrees and how these contribute to patients’ gait speed and functional mobility. Sixty-three PwMS divided into three groups according to the “Expanded Disability Status Scale” (MS1: EDSS ≤ 1.5; MS2: 2 ≤ EDSS ≤ 3.5; MS3: 4 ≤ EDSS ≤ 6) and 22 healthy controls (HC) participated in this study. MS1 showed lower balance and hip strength compared to HC. MS2 showed lower balance, core stability, gait speed, and functional mobility than MS1. MS3 showed lower gait speed, functional mobility, balance, and knee flexion strength than MS2. No between-group differences were observed in perceived fatigue. Relative weight analysis showed that strength, balance and core stability explained 60%–70% of the variance in gait speed and functional mobility. The decline of each parameter did not evolve at the same rate across the different stages of the disease, being knee flexion strength and balance the most influential factors in the disability progression. Overall, these results provide useful information to guide exercise prescription at different stages of MS. View Full-Text
Keywords: neurodegeneration; gait; balance; strength; perceived fatigue; relative weight analysis neurodegeneration; gait; balance; strength; perceived fatigue; relative weight analysis
MDPI and ACS Style

Moreno-Navarro, P.; Gomez-Illán, R.; Carpena-Juan, C.; P. Sempere, Á.; Vera-Garcia, F.J.; Barbado, D. Understanding the Deterioration of Gait, Postural Control, Lower Limb Strength and Perceived Fatigue Across the Disability Spectrum of People with Multiple Sclerosis. J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 1385. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051385

AMA Style

Moreno-Navarro P, Gomez-Illán R, Carpena-Juan C, P. Sempere Á, Vera-Garcia FJ, Barbado D. Understanding the Deterioration of Gait, Postural Control, Lower Limb Strength and Perceived Fatigue Across the Disability Spectrum of People with Multiple Sclerosis. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(5):1385. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051385

Chicago/Turabian Style

Moreno-Navarro, Pedro, Ramón Gomez-Illán, Carmen Carpena-Juan, Ángel P. Sempere, Francisco J. Vera-Garcia, and David Barbado. 2020. "Understanding the Deterioration of Gait, Postural Control, Lower Limb Strength and Perceived Fatigue Across the Disability Spectrum of People with Multiple Sclerosis" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 5: 1385. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9051385

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