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Effective Asthma Management: Is It Time to Let the AIR out of SABA?

1
Family Physician Airways Group of Canada, Edmonton, AB T5X 4P8, Canada
2
Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4, Canada
3
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R7, Canada
4
Association of Allergists and Immunologists of Québec, Montréal, QC H5B 1G8, Canada
5
Asthma Canada, Toronto, ON M4S 2Z2, Canada
6
Division of Allergy & Immunology, Department of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9(4), 921; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040921
Received: 10 March 2020 / Revised: 20 March 2020 / Accepted: 21 March 2020 / Published: 27 March 2020
For years, standard asthma treatment has included short acting beta agonists (SABA), including as monotherapy in patients with mild asthma symptoms. In the Global Initiative for Asthma 2019 strategy for the management of asthma, the authors recommended a significant departure from the traditional treatments. Short acting beta agonists (SABAs) are no longer recommended as the preferred reliever for patients when they are symptomatic and should not be used at all as monotherapy because of significant safety concerns and poor outcomes. Instead, the more appropriate course is the use of a combined inhaled corticosteroid–fast acting beta agonist as a reliever. This paper discusses the issues associated with the use of SABA, the reasons that patients over-use SABA, difficulties that can be expected in overcoming SABA over-reliance in patients, and our evolving understanding of the use of “anti-inflammatory relievers” in our patients with asthma. View Full-Text
Keywords: SABA overuse; systemic steroid overuse; asthma control; mild asthma; ICS adherence; treatment; exacerbation SABA overuse; systemic steroid overuse; asthma control; mild asthma; ICS adherence; treatment; exacerbation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kaplan, A.; Mitchell, P.D.; Cave, A.J.; Gagnon, R.; Foran, V.; Ellis, A.K. Effective Asthma Management: Is It Time to Let the AIR out of SABA? J. Clin. Med. 2020, 9, 921. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040921

AMA Style

Kaplan A, Mitchell PD, Cave AJ, Gagnon R, Foran V, Ellis AK. Effective Asthma Management: Is It Time to Let the AIR out of SABA? Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2020; 9(4):921. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040921

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kaplan, Alan, Patrick D. Mitchell, Andrew J. Cave, Remi Gagnon, Vanessa Foran, and Anne K. Ellis. 2020. "Effective Asthma Management: Is It Time to Let the AIR out of SABA?" Journal of Clinical Medicine 9, no. 4: 921. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm9040921

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