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Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care on Short- and Long-Term Maternal Weight Retention and Breastfeeding Behavior—12 Months Follow-up of the Cluster-Randomized GeliS Trial

1
Else Kröner-Fresenius-Centre for Nutritional Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Georg-Brauchle-Ring 62, 80992 Munich, Bavaria, Germany
2
Competence Centre for Nutrition (KErn), Am Gereuth 4, 85354 Freising, Bavaria, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(6), 876; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8060876
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 3 June 2019 / Accepted: 17 June 2019 / Published: 19 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health in Preconception Pregnancy and Postpartum)
Postpartum weight retention (PPWR) is associated with an increased risk for maternal obesity and is discussed to be influenced by breastfeeding. The objective was to evaluate the effect of a lifestyle intervention delivered three times during pregnancy and once in the postpartum period on PPWR and on maternal breastfeeding behavior. In total, 1998 participants of the cluster-randomized “healthy living in pregnancy” (GeliS) trial were followed up until the 12th month postpartum (T2pp). Data were collected using maternity records and questionnaires. Data on breastfeeding behavior were collected at T2pp. At T2pp, mean PPWR was lower in women receiving counseling (IV) compared to the control group (C) (−0.2 ± 4.8 kg vs. 0.6 ± 5.2 kg), but there was no significant evidence of between-group differences (adjusted p = 0.123). In the IV, women lost more weight from delivery until T2pp compared to the C (adjusted p = 0.008) and showed a slightly higher rate of exclusive breastfeeding (IV: 87.4%; C: 84.4%; adjusted p < 0.001). In conclusion, we found evidence for slight improvements of maternal postpartum weight characteristics and the rate of exclusive breastfeeding in women receiving a lifestyle intervention embedded in routine care, although the clinical meaning of these findings is unclear. View Full-Text
Keywords: weight retention; breastfeeding; lifestyle intervention; pregnancy; obesity prevention; routine care; gestational weight gain; postpartum; long-term; follow-up weight retention; breastfeeding; lifestyle intervention; pregnancy; obesity prevention; routine care; gestational weight gain; postpartum; long-term; follow-up
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hoffmann, J.; Günther, J.; Stecher, L.; Spies, M.; Meyer, D.; Kunath, J.; Raab, R.; Rauh, K.; Hauner, H. Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care on Short- and Long-Term Maternal Weight Retention and Breastfeeding Behavior—12 Months Follow-up of the Cluster-Randomized GeliS Trial. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 876. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8060876

AMA Style

Hoffmann J, Günther J, Stecher L, Spies M, Meyer D, Kunath J, Raab R, Rauh K, Hauner H. Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care on Short- and Long-Term Maternal Weight Retention and Breastfeeding Behavior—12 Months Follow-up of the Cluster-Randomized GeliS Trial. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(6):876. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8060876

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hoffmann, Julia; Günther, Julia; Stecher, Lynne; Spies, Monika; Meyer, Dorothy; Kunath, Julia; Raab, Roxana; Rauh, Kathrin; Hauner, Hans. 2019. "Effects of a Lifestyle Intervention in Routine Care on Short- and Long-Term Maternal Weight Retention and Breastfeeding Behavior—12 Months Follow-up of the Cluster-Randomized GeliS Trial" J. Clin. Med. 8, no. 6: 876. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8060876

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