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Innovative Modeling Techniques and 3D Printing in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices: A Bridge from Bench to Clinical Practice

1
Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, Middletown, New York, NY 10940, USA
2
Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA
3
Department of Internal Medicine, Houston Methodist Hospital, Houston, TX 77030, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 635; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050635
Received: 3 April 2019 / Revised: 24 April 2019 / Accepted: 1 May 2019 / Published: 9 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Use of Left Ventricular Assist Devices)
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Abstract

Left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) cause altered flow dynamics that may result in complications such as stroke, pump thrombosis, bleeding, or aortic regurgitation. Understanding altered flow dynamics is important in order to develop more efficient and durable pump configurations. In patients with LVAD, hemodynamic assessment is limited to imaging techniques such as echocardiography which precludes detailed assessment of fluid dynamics. In this review article, we present some innovative modeling techniques that are often used in device development or for research purposes, but have not been utilized clinically. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling is based on computer simulations and particle image velocimetry (PIV) employs ex vivo models that helps study fluid characteristics such as pressure, shear stress, and velocity. Both techniques may help elaborate our understanding of complications that occur with LVAD and could be potentially used in the future to troubleshoot LVAD-related alarms. These techniques coupled with 3D printing may also allow for patient-specific device implants, lowering the risk of complications increasing device durability. View Full-Text
Keywords: LVAD; computational fluid dynamic modeling; particle image velocimetry; 3D printing LVAD; computational fluid dynamic modeling; particle image velocimetry; 3D printing
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Thaker, R.; Araujo-Gutierrez, R.; Marcos-Abdala, H.G.; Agrawal, T.; Fida, N.; Kassi, M. Innovative Modeling Techniques and 3D Printing in Patients with Left Ventricular Assist Devices: A Bridge from Bench to Clinical Practice. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 635.

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