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Neural Processing of Disorder-Related Stimuli in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa: A Narrative Review of Brain Imaging Studies
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Anorexia Nervosa and the Immune System—A Narrative Review

1
Assistant Medical Director, ACUTE Center for Eating Disorders @ Denver Health; Assistant Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine; 777 Bannock St., Denver, CO 80204, USA
2
President, Eating Recovery Center; Founder and Executive Medical Director, ACUTE Center for Eating Disorders @ Denver Health; Glassman Professor of Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine; 7351 E Lowry Blvd, Suite 200, Denver, CO 80230, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(11), 1915; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111915
Received: 13 September 2019 / Revised: 24 October 2019 / Accepted: 4 November 2019 / Published: 8 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anorexia Nervosa)
The pathogenesis of an increasing number of chronic diseases is being attributed to effects of the immune system. However, its role in the development and maintenance of anorexia nervosa is seemingly under-appreciated. Yet, in examining the available research on the immune system and genetic studies in anorexia nervosa, one becomes increasingly suspicious of the immune system’s potential role in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa. Specifically, research is suggestive of increased levels of various pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as the spontaneous production of tumor necrosis factor in anorexia nervosa; genetic studies further support a dysregulated immune system in this disorder. Potential contributors to this dysregulated immune system are discussed including increased oxidative stress, chronic physiological/psychological stress, changes in the intestinal microbiota, and an abnormal bone marrow microenvironment, all of which are present in anorexia nervosa. View Full-Text
Keywords: anorexia nervosa; eating disorders; immune system; inflammation; cytokines anorexia nervosa; eating disorders; immune system; inflammation; cytokines
MDPI and ACS Style

Gibson, D.; Mehler, P.S. Anorexia Nervosa and the Immune System—A Narrative Review. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1915.

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