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Article

Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial

1
Center for Psychiatry Research, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, & Stockholm Region Healthcare Services, Norra Stationsgatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden
2
Stockholm Center for Dependency Disorders, Stockholm Region Healthcare Services, SE-112 81 Stockholm, Sweden
3
Department of Criminology, Malmö University, SE-205 06 Malmö, Sweden
4
Trimbos Institute—The Netherlands Institute of Mental Health and Addiction, 3500 AS Utrecht, The Netherlands
5
Arkin Mental Health Care, 1033 NN Amsterdam, The Netherlands
6
Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, Location AMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105 AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(11), 1807; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111807
Received: 8 August 2019 / Revised: 21 October 2019 / Accepted: 24 October 2019 / Published: 28 October 2019
Overconsumption of alcohol, from hazardous to excessive, heavy, and harmful levels, is common among university students. Consenting Swedish students were assigned to one of two smartphone apps offering feedback on estimated blood alcohol concentration (eBAC; Promillekoll/PartyPlanner) or assessment only (n = 2166; 1:1:1 ratio). App participants with excessive drinking according to public health criteria (>9/>14 drinks/week for women/men, respectively) at a 7 week follow-up were additionally assigned to the skills-based TeleCoach app or waitlist (n = 186; 1:1 ratio). All participants were followed at 14 and 20 weeks. At 7 weeks, Promillekoll users showed higher risk of excessive drinking (odds ratio (OR) = 1.83; p ≤ 0.01; n = 1558). Students in eBAC app groups with only hazardous use showed fewer binge drinking occasions at 14 weeks and lower eBAC levels up to 20 weeks compared to controls (n = 1157). Also, more highly motivated participants at baseline in both eBAC app groups drank less compared to controls at 7 and 20 weeks. Hidden Markov model analysis revealed a frequent-heavy drinking group (n = 146; 4.6 days/week, SD = 1.4), where those with access to TeleCoach had fewer drinking days compared to assessment-only controls (p < 0.001). eBAC apps showed positive effects up to 20 weeks, particularly for motivated students, and a skills-based app can reduce consumption for those with frequent-heavy drinking patterns. View Full-Text
Keywords: hazardous alcohol use; university students; smartphone apps; m-health; brief intervention hazardous alcohol use; university students; smartphone apps; m-health; brief intervention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Berman, A.H.; Andersson, C.; Gajecki, M.; Rosendahl, I.; Sinadinovic, K.; Blankers, M. Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1807. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111807

AMA Style

Berman AH, Andersson C, Gajecki M, Rosendahl I, Sinadinovic K, Blankers M. Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(11):1807. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111807

Chicago/Turabian Style

Berman, Anne H., Claes Andersson, Mikael Gajecki, Ingvar Rosendahl, Kristina Sinadinovic, and Matthijs Blankers. 2019. "Smartphone Apps Targeting Hazardous Drinking Patterns among University Students Show Differential Subgroup Effects over 20 Weeks: Results from a Randomized, Controlled Trial" Journal of Clinical Medicine 8, no. 11: 1807. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8111807

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