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Article

Heat Generation at the Implant–Bone Interface by Insertion of Ceramic and Titanium Implants

1
Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Oral and Dental Medicine at Goethe University, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
2
Private Practice, 60385 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
3
Private Practice, 60313 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
4
Institute of Biostatistics and Mathematical Modelling at Goethe University, 60590 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Holger Zipprich and Paul Weigl contributed equally to this study.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(10), 1541; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101541
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 16 September 2019 / Accepted: 17 September 2019 / Published: 25 September 2019
Purpose: The aim of this study is to record material- and surface-dependent heat dissipation during the process of inserting implants into native animal bone. Materials and Methods: Implants made of titanium and zirconium that were identical in macrodesign were inserted under controlled conditions into a bovine rib tempered to 37 °C. The resulting surface temperature was measured on two bone windows by an infrared camera. The results of the six experimental groups, ceramic machined (1), sandblasted (2), and sandblasted and acid-etched surfaces (3) versus titanium implants with the corresponding surfaces (4, 5, and 6) were statistically tested. Results: The average temperature increase, 3 mm subcrestally at ceramic implants, differed with high statistical significance (p = 7.163 × 10−9, resulting from group-adjusted linear mixed-effects model) from titanium. The surface texture of ceramic implants shows a statistical difference between group 3 (15.44 ± 3.63 °C) and group 1 (19.94 ± 3.28 °C) or group 2 (19.39 ± 5.73 °C) surfaces. Within the titanium implants, the temperature changes were similar for all surfaces. Conclusion: Within the limits of an in vitro study, the high temperature rises at ceramic versus titanium implants should be limited by a very slow insertion velocity. View Full-Text
Keywords: zirconia; dental implant; insertion; bone–implant interface; heat; bone damage; early loss zirconia; dental implant; insertion; bone–implant interface; heat; bone damage; early loss
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zipprich, H.; Weigl, P.; König, E.; Toderas, A.; Balaban, Ü.; Ratka, C. Heat Generation at the Implant–Bone Interface by Insertion of Ceramic and Titanium Implants. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1541. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101541

AMA Style

Zipprich H, Weigl P, König E, Toderas A, Balaban Ü, Ratka C. Heat Generation at the Implant–Bone Interface by Insertion of Ceramic and Titanium Implants. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(10):1541. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101541

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zipprich, Holger, Paul Weigl, Eugenie König, Alexandra Toderas, Ümniye Balaban, and Christoph Ratka. 2019. "Heat Generation at the Implant–Bone Interface by Insertion of Ceramic and Titanium Implants" Journal of Clinical Medicine 8, no. 10: 1541. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101541

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