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Article

Stimulation of Human Osteoblast Differentiation in Magneto-Mechanically Actuated Ferromagnetic Fiber Networks

1
Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, UK
2
Division of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Cambridge, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, Hills Road, Cambridge CB2 2QQ, UK
3
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110 016, India
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(10), 1522; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101522
Received: 21 August 2019 / Revised: 13 September 2019 / Accepted: 19 September 2019 / Published: 22 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Latest Clinical And Basic Science Advances In Bone Regeneration)
There is currently an interest in “active” implantable biomedical devices that include mechanical stimulation as an integral part of their design. This paper reports the experimental use of a porous scaffold made of interconnected networks of slender ferromagnetic fibers that can be actuated in vivo by an external magnetic field applying strains to in-growing cells. Such scaffolds have been previously characterized in terms of their mechanical and cellular responses. In this study, it is shown that the shape changes induced in the scaffolds can be used to promote osteogenesis in vitro. In particular, immunofluorescence, gene and protein analyses reveal that the actuated networks exhibit higher mineralization and extracellular matrix production, and express higher levels of osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1α1, runt-related transcription factor 2 and bone morphogenetic protein 2 than the static controls at the 3-week time point. The results suggest that the cells filling the inter-fiber spaces are able to sense and react to the magneto-mechanically induced strains facilitating osteogenic differentiation and maturation. This work provides evidence in support of using this approach to stimulate bone ingrowth around a device implanted in bone and can pave the way for further applications in bone tissue engineering. View Full-Text
Keywords: magneto-mechanical actuation; fiber networks; human osteoblasts; mineralization; in vitro osteogenesis magneto-mechanical actuation; fiber networks; human osteoblasts; mineralization; in vitro osteogenesis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Katarivas Levy, G.; Birch, M.A.; Brooks, R.A.; Neelakantan, S.; Markaki, A.E. Stimulation of Human Osteoblast Differentiation in Magneto-Mechanically Actuated Ferromagnetic Fiber Networks. J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8, 1522. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101522

AMA Style

Katarivas Levy G, Birch MA, Brooks RA, Neelakantan S, Markaki AE. Stimulation of Human Osteoblast Differentiation in Magneto-Mechanically Actuated Ferromagnetic Fiber Networks. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2019; 8(10):1522. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101522

Chicago/Turabian Style

Katarivas Levy, Galit, Mark A. Birch, Roger A. Brooks, Suresh Neelakantan, and Athina E. Markaki. 2019. "Stimulation of Human Osteoblast Differentiation in Magneto-Mechanically Actuated Ferromagnetic Fiber Networks" Journal of Clinical Medicine 8, no. 10: 1522. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8101522

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