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Primary Care Provider Counseling Practices about Adverse Drug Reactions and Interactions in Croatia

1
Faculty of Medicine, University of Osijek, Josipa Huttlera 4, HR-31000 Osijek, Croatia
2
Faculty of Dental Medicine and Health, University of Osijek, Crkvena 21, HR-31000 Osijek, Croatia
3
Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06032, USA
4
Division of Gastroenterology-Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Osijek University Hospital, Josipa Huttlera 4, HR-31000 Osijek, Croatia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(9), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7090231
Received: 27 June 2018 / Revised: 20 August 2018 / Accepted: 20 August 2018 / Published: 22 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Epidemiology & Public Health)
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PDF [210 KB, uploaded 22 August 2018]

Abstract

Background: Prescribing medications is one of the most common medical decisions that is made by primary care providers (PCPs). In the Republic of Croatia, PCPs hold a key position in prescribing and evaluating the medications that are provided for patients. Accordingly, providing advice for patients regarding the potential adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is frequently the responsibility of the PCPs. The aim of the current study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and counseling practices of PCPs regarding drug interactions and adverse effects. Methods: After enrolling 195 PCPs that were selected at random, a survey was conducted while using an anonymous questionnaire that was created based on previously published studies, adjusted in a way that includes the most commonly prescribed medications in Croatia. Results: Of the 10 questions on knowledge about DDIs and ADRs, the median number of correct responses by PCPs was 5 (interquartile range 4 to 7). More than half of respondents (56%) agreed with the claim that knowledge of drug side effects facilitated their work in family medicine. Almost all of the respondents (92.8%) explained side effects and drug interactions to special groups of patients (pregnant women, elderly patients etc.). Conclusion: The results show a need for additional education in the field of drug prescribing. However, PCPs were aware of the importance of counseling practices about adverse drug reactions and interactions and counseling practices among special patients populations are satisfactory. View Full-Text
Keywords: drug interactions; adverse drug reactions; primary care providers; attitudes; counseling drug interactions; adverse drug reactions; primary care providers; attitudes; counseling
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Raguz Lucic, N.; Jakab, J.; Smolic, M.; Milas, A.-M.; Omanovic Kolaric, T.; Nincevic, V.; Bojanic, K.; Kralik, K.; Miskulin, M.; Wu, G.Y.; Smolic, R. Primary Care Provider Counseling Practices about Adverse Drug Reactions and Interactions in Croatia. J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7, 231.

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