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J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7(7), 169; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm7070169

Physical Frailty and Amyloid-β Deposits in the Brains of Older Adults with Cognitive Frailty

1
Health and Exercise Science Laboratory, Institute of Sports Science, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanangno, Gwanak-Gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
2
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center 5-20 Boramaero, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 07061, Korea
3
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea
4
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, 5-20 Boramaero, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 07061, Korea
5
Department of Biomedical Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea
6
Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, 101 Daehak-ro, Jongno-gu, Seoul 03080, Korea
7
Institute on Aging, Seoul National University, Seoul 03087, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 May 2018 / Revised: 22 June 2018 / Accepted: 6 July 2018 / Published: 9 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mild Cognitive Impairment)
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Abstract

Background: Cognitive frailty and impairment are phenotypically and pathophysiologically correlated with physical frailty. We examined associations between accumulation of amyloid-β in the brain as a brain imaging biomarker and phenotypes of physical frailty (weight loss, weakness, exhaustion, slowness, low physical activity) in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and cognitive frailty. Methods: Cross-sectional associations between brain amyloid-β accumulation measured with 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB)-positron emission tomography (PET) and physical frailty were examined in 48 elderly participants (mean age: 75.1 ± 6.6 years; 73% female). Cortical and regional standard uptake value ratios (SUVRs) were obtained. Main outcome measures included frailty phenotypes and physical functions (gait speed, short physical performance battery, and Timed Up and Go tests). Results: Mean cortical region of interest and regional SUVRs (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, parietal cortex, precuneus/posterior cingulate cortex (PC/PCC), hippocampus, basal ganglia, and global SUVR) were associated with gait speed, Timed Up and Go, and short physical performance battery (PC/PCC, basal ganglia). In addition, SUVRs of all brain regions were significantly linked to weakness. Conclusion: SUVRs of all brain regions revealed an association between brain amyloid-β accumulation and weakness. Furthermore, global SUVRs (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, parietal cortex, PC/PCC, hippocampus, basal ganglia) were associated with gait parameters. View Full-Text
Keywords: cognition; frailty; physical function; brain aging cognition; frailty; physical function; brain aging
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    Description: Figure A1. Representative images of regions of interest based on Automatic Anatomic Labeling (AAL) for individual 11C-PiB-PET data. Using the published list of automatically labeled regions [1920], the frontal regions of interest (ROIs) included bilateral frontal, anterior cingulate, middle cingulate, and insular cortex regions (region (3–34); the posterior cingulate-precuneus ROIs included bilateral regions (region 35;36) and (region 67;68); the lateral temporal ROIs included bilateral regions (region 79–90); the lateral parietal ROIs included bilateral regions (region 59–65); the basal ganglia ROIs included bilateral caudate, putamen, and globus pallidus regions (region 71–76); the medial temporal ROIs included bilateral hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and amygdala regions (region 37–42); and the cerebellar reference ROIs included bilateral cerebellar crus I regions (region 91;92) [212]. Figure A2. Representative images of 11C-PiB-PET for cerebral amyloid burden of the same MCI and the cognitive frailty patients. Images scaled to the same SUVR are shown. Left row: negative amyloid scan; right row: positive amyloid scan. SUVR = standard uptake value ratio.
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Yoon, D.H.; Lee, J.-Y.; Shin, S.A.; Kim, Y.K.; Song, W. Physical Frailty and Amyloid-β Deposits in the Brains of Older Adults with Cognitive Frailty. J. Clin. Med. 2018, 7, 169.

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