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Article

No Significant Bone Resorption after Open Treatment of Mandibular Condylar Head Fractures in the Medium-Term

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Leipzig University, Liebigstraße 12, 04103 Leipzig, Germany
2
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Hannover Medical School, Carl-Neuberg-Str. 1, 30625 Hannover, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Academic Editors: Jeremie D. Oliver and Michael S. Hu
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(10), 2868; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11102868
Received: 16 April 2022 / Revised: 9 May 2022 / Accepted: 10 May 2022 / Published: 19 May 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State of the Art in Craniofacial Surgery)
Open treatment of condylar head fractures (CHF) is considered controversial. In this retrospective cohort study our primary objective was therefore to assess bone resorption and remodeling as well as patients function after open treatment of CHF in a medium-term follow-up (15.1 ± 2.2 months). We included 18 patients with 25 CHF who underwent open reduction and internal fixation, between 2016 and 2021, in our analysis. The clinical data and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) datasets were analyzed. The condylar processes were segmented in the postoperative (T1) and follow-up (T2) CBCT scans. Volumetric and linear bone changes were the primary outcome variables, measured by using a sophisticated 3D-algorithm. The mean condylar head volume decreased non-significantly from 3022.01 ± 825.77 mm3 (T1) to 2878.8 ± 735.60 mm3 (T2; p = 0.52). Morphological alterations indicated remodeling and resorption. The pre-operative maximal interincisal opening (MIO) was 19.75 ± 3.07 mm and significantly improved to 40.47 ± 1.7 mm during follow-up (p = 0.0005). Low rates of postoperative complications were observed. Open reduction of CHF leads to good clinical outcomes and low rates of medium-term complications. This study underlines the feasibility and importance of open treatment of CHF and may help to spread its acceptance as the preferred treatment option. View Full-Text
Keywords: condylar head fractures; intraarticular fractures; ORIF; open treatment; bone remodeling; mandibular condyle fractures; CHF condylar head fractures; intraarticular fractures; ORIF; open treatment; bone remodeling; mandibular condyle fractures; CHF
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MDPI and ACS Style

Neuhaus, M.-T.; Gellrich, N.-C.; Sander, A.K.; Lethaus, B.; Halama, D.; Zimmerer, R.M. No Significant Bone Resorption after Open Treatment of Mandibular Condylar Head Fractures in the Medium-Term. J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11, 2868. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11102868

AMA Style

Neuhaus M-T, Gellrich N-C, Sander AK, Lethaus B, Halama D, Zimmerer RM. No Significant Bone Resorption after Open Treatment of Mandibular Condylar Head Fractures in the Medium-Term. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2022; 11(10):2868. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11102868

Chicago/Turabian Style

Neuhaus, Michael-Tobias, Nils-Claudius Gellrich, Anna Katharina Sander, Bernd Lethaus, Dirk Halama, and Rüdiger M. Zimmerer. 2022. "No Significant Bone Resorption after Open Treatment of Mandibular Condylar Head Fractures in the Medium-Term" Journal of Clinical Medicine 11, no. 10: 2868. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11102868

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