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Article

Active Ingredients of Voice Therapy for Muscle Tension Voice Disorders: A Retrospective Data Audit

1
Voice Research Laboratory, Discipline of Speech Pathology, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Faculty of Medicine and Health, Central Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Renee Speyer
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(18), 4135; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10184135
Received: 12 August 2021 / Revised: 7 September 2021 / Accepted: 8 September 2021 / Published: 14 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Management of Voice and Swallowing Disorders)
Background: Although voice therapy is the first line treatment for muscle-tension voice disorders (MTVD), no clinical research has investigated the role of specific active ingredients. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of active ingredients in the treatment of MTVD. A retrospective review of a clinical voice database was conducted on 68 MTVD patients who were treated using the optimal phonation task (OPT) and sob voice quality (SVQ), as well as two different processes: task variation and negative practice (NP). Mixed-model analysis was performed on auditory–perceptual and acoustic data from voice recordings at baseline and after each technique. Active ingredients were evaluated using effect sizes. Significant overall treatment effects were observed for the treatment program. Effect sizes ranged from 0.34 (post-NP) to 0.387 (post-SVQ) for overall severity ratings. Effect sizes ranged from 0.237 (post-SVQ) to 0.445 (post-NP) for a smoothed cepstral peak prominence measure. The treatment effects did not depend upon the MTVD type (primary or secondary), treating clinicians, nor the number of sessions and days between sessions. Implementation of individual techniques that promote improved voice quality and processes that support learning resulted in improved habitual voice quality. Both voice techniques and processes can be considered as active ingredients in voice therapy. View Full-Text
Keywords: Sob Voice Therapy; Optimal Phonation Task; Negative Practice; auditory-perceptual analysis; acoustic voice analysis Sob Voice Therapy; Optimal Phonation Task; Negative Practice; auditory-perceptual analysis; acoustic voice analysis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Madill, C.; Chacon, A.; Kirby, E.; Novakovic, D.; Nguyen, D.D. Active Ingredients of Voice Therapy for Muscle Tension Voice Disorders: A Retrospective Data Audit. J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10, 4135. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10184135

AMA Style

Madill C, Chacon A, Kirby E, Novakovic D, Nguyen DD. Active Ingredients of Voice Therapy for Muscle Tension Voice Disorders: A Retrospective Data Audit. Journal of Clinical Medicine. 2021; 10(18):4135. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10184135

Chicago/Turabian Style

Madill, Catherine, Antonia Chacon, Evan Kirby, Daniel Novakovic, and Duy D. Nguyen 2021. "Active Ingredients of Voice Therapy for Muscle Tension Voice Disorders: A Retrospective Data Audit" Journal of Clinical Medicine 10, no. 18: 4135. https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10184135

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