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Immune Response to Vaccination against COVID-19 in Breastfeeding Health Workers

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Department of Nephrology and Transplantation Medicine, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wroclaw, Poland
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Department of Neonatology, Wroclaw Medical University, 50-367 Wroclaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Ralph A. Tripp
Vaccines 2021, 9(6), 663; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9060663
Received: 14 May 2021 / Revised: 10 June 2021 / Accepted: 15 June 2021 / Published: 17 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section COVID-19 Vaccines and Vaccination)
Background: Initially, there were no data on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines in lactating women. The aim of our study was to evaluate the immune response to COVID-19 vaccinations in breastfeeding women. Methods: The study included 32 breastfeeding women who, regardless of the study, had decided to be vaccinated. Maternal serum and breast milk samples were simultaneously collected on days 8 ± 1, 22 ± 2, 29 ± 3, and 43 ± 4 after the first dose of the vaccine. The immune response was assessed by determining the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG and IgA. Results: The breast milk IgG level was detectable (6.50 ± 6.74, median 4.7, and maximum 34.2 BAU/mL) and highly correlated to serum IgG level (rS 0.89; p < 0.001). The breast milk ratio of IgA to the cut-off value was higher in serum IgA-positive (4.18 ± 3.26, median 2.8, and maximum >10) than in serum IgA-negative women (0.56 ± 0.37, median 0.5, and maximum 1.6; p < 0.001). The highest concentrations of serum and breast milk antibodies were observed on day 29 ± 3 with a decrease on day 43 ± 4. Conclusion: The immune response to the vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 is strongest 7 ± 3 days after the second dose of the vaccine. Lactating mothers breastfeeding their children after vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 may transfer antibodies to their infant. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast milk; breastfeeding; anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies; lactation; COVID-19; vaccination; mRNA vaccine breast milk; breastfeeding; anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies; lactation; COVID-19; vaccination; mRNA vaccine
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MDPI and ACS Style

Jakuszko, K.; Kościelska-Kasprzak, K.; Żabińska, M.; Bartoszek, D.; Poznański, P.; Rukasz, D.; Kłak, R.; Królak-Olejnik, B.; Krajewska, M. Immune Response to Vaccination against COVID-19 in Breastfeeding Health Workers. Vaccines 2021, 9, 663. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9060663

AMA Style

Jakuszko K, Kościelska-Kasprzak K, Żabińska M, Bartoszek D, Poznański P, Rukasz D, Kłak R, Królak-Olejnik B, Krajewska M. Immune Response to Vaccination against COVID-19 in Breastfeeding Health Workers. Vaccines. 2021; 9(6):663. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9060663

Chicago/Turabian Style

Jakuszko, Katarzyna, Katarzyna Kościelska-Kasprzak, Marcelina Żabińska, Dorota Bartoszek, Paweł Poznański, Dagna Rukasz, Renata Kłak, Barbara Królak-Olejnik, and Magdalena Krajewska. 2021. "Immune Response to Vaccination against COVID-19 in Breastfeeding Health Workers" Vaccines 9, no. 6: 663. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9060663

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