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Targeting COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in Minority Populations in the US: Implications for Herd Immunity

1
Center for AIDS Health Disparities Research, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College, 1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd., Nashville, TN 37208-3599, USA
2
Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College, 1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd., Nashville, TN 37208-3599, USA
3
Center for AIDS Health Disparities Research, Department of Microbiology, Immunology, and Physiology, School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College, 1005 Dr. D.B. Todd Jr. Blvd., Nashville, TN 37208, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tiziana Ramaci and Massimiliano Barattucci
Vaccines 2021, 9(5), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9050489
Received: 29 March 2021 / Revised: 6 May 2021 / Accepted: 7 May 2021 / Published: 11 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Vaccination and Compliance/Hesitancy)
There has been a continuous underrepresentation of minorities in healthcare research and vaccine trials, along with long-standing systemic racism and discrimination that have been fueling the distrust of the healthcare system among these communities for decades. The history and legacy of racial injustices and negative experiences within a culturally insensitive healthcare system have greatly contributed to vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minorities. COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy will impact vaccine uptake in the US, subsequently hindering the establishment of herd immunity (75–85% of the population vaccinated) to mitigate SARS-CoV-2 infection and transmission. Information targeting underserved racial/ethnic minorities in the US in a culturally competent manner has been lacking. This information is crucial for educating these communities about COVID-19 vaccines and their distribution as well as dispelling misinformation regarding vaccine trials, safety, and efficacy. This lack of education has greatly contributed to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and will increase disparities in vaccine uptake. Moreover, timely vaccinations are also essential to curtailing virus transmission and the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 variants that may evade the immune response produced by the three existing COVID-19 vaccines. View Full-Text
Keywords: health disparities; coronavirus; vaccine hesitancy; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; minorities populations; health inequities health disparities; coronavirus; vaccine hesitancy; SARS-CoV-2; COVID-19; minorities populations; health inequities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Hildreth, J.E.K.; Alcendor, D.J. Targeting COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in Minority Populations in the US: Implications for Herd Immunity. Vaccines 2021, 9, 489. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9050489

AMA Style

Hildreth JEK, Alcendor DJ. Targeting COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in Minority Populations in the US: Implications for Herd Immunity. Vaccines. 2021; 9(5):489. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9050489

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hildreth, James E.K., and Donald J. Alcendor 2021. "Targeting COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy in Minority Populations in the US: Implications for Herd Immunity" Vaccines 9, no. 5: 489. https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines9050489

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