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Open AccessArticle

Ocular and Systemic Effects of Antioxidative Supplement Use in Young and Healthy Adults: Real-World Cross-Sectional Data

1
Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
2
Laboratory of Retinal Cell Biology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582, Japan
3
Department of Ophthalmology, St. Luke’s International Hospital, 9-1 Akashi-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8560, Japan
4
St. Luke’s International University, 9-1 Akashi-cho, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8560, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Antioxidants 2020, 9(6), 487; https://doi.org/10.3390/antiox9060487
Received: 10 May 2020 / Revised: 29 May 2020 / Accepted: 1 June 2020 / Published: 3 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in Health and Diseases)
Randomized controlled studies have shown that antioxidative supplements are effective in suppressing the progression of age-related macular degeneration and visual display terminal syndrome. However, effects of their general use in the real-world and by young and healthy individuals have not been well documented. We analyzed 27 participants who were under 35 years of age and had no diagnosed diseases. Mean functional visual acuity (FVA) score and visual maintenance ratio, which represent quick recognition of a target, both measured using FVA system, were better (both p < 0.01) in subjects who had had regular antioxidative supplement intake for more than 2 months (11 participants) compared with those who had not. Systemic data, i.e., total cholesterol, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels, which correspond to chronic low-grade inflammation, were lower (all p < 0.05) in the former. Overall, hs-CRP levels had a correlation with total cholesterol (p < 0.05) and a trend of correlation with HbA1c (p = 0.054) levels. Thus, current real-world data showed that young, healthy participants who had a regular intake of antioxidative supplements had better visual acuity and systemic levels of metabolic and low-grade inflammation markers. This study will help promote future research into the effects of general antioxidative supplement use. View Full-Text
Keywords: antioxidative supplement; visual acuity; hs-CRP; cholesterol; HbA1c antioxidative supplement; visual acuity; hs-CRP; cholesterol; HbA1c
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MDPI and ACS Style

Minami, S.; Nagai, N.; Suzuki, M.; Uchida, A.; Shinoda, H.; Tsubota, K.; Ozawa, Y. Ocular and Systemic Effects of Antioxidative Supplement Use in Young and Healthy Adults: Real-World Cross-Sectional Data. Antioxidants 2020, 9, 487.

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