Next Article in Journal
Effects of High Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (HF-rTMS) on Delay Discounting in Major Depressive Disorder: An Open-Label Uncontrolled Pilot Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Does Video Gaming Have Impacts on the Brain: Evidence from a Systematic Review
Previous Article in Journal
Ethanol Induction of Innate Immune Signals Across BV2 Microglia and SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Involves Induction of IL-4 and IL-13
Previous Article in Special Issue
Vigilance Decrement and Enhancement Techniques: A Review
Open AccessArticle

Physiological Correlates of Moral Decision-Making in the Professional Domain

by Michela Balconi 1,2 and Giulia Fronda 1,2,*
1
Department of Psychology, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 20123 Milan, Italy
2
Research Unit in Affective and Social Neuroscience, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, 20123 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2019, 9(9), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci9090229
Received: 25 July 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 8 September 2019 / Published: 11 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Collection Collection on Cognitive Neuroscience)
Moral decision-making is central to guide our social behavior, and it is based on emotional and cognitive reasoning processes. In the present research, we investigated the moral decision-making in a company context by the recording of autonomic responses (skin conductance response, heart rate frequency, and variability), in three different moral conditions (professional fit, company fit, social fit) and three different offers (fair, unfair, neutral). In particular, the first professional fit condition required participants to accept or reject some offers proposing the money subdivision for a work done together with a colleague. The second company fit condition required participants to evaluate offers regarding the investment of a part of the money in the introduction of some company’s benefits. Finally, the third social fit condition required participants to accept or refuse a money subdivision to support a colleague’s relative with health problems financially. Results underlined the significant effect of both the condition, with increased autonomic effects more for personal and social than company fit, and the offer type, with differences for fair and neutral offers compared to unfair ones. This research shows how individual, situational, and contextual factors influence moral decision-making in a company context. View Full-Text
Keywords: moral decision-making; skin conductance response (SCR); heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV); fairness; company moral decision-making; skin conductance response (SCR); heart rate (HR); heart rate variability (HRV); fairness; company
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Balconi, M.; Fronda, G. Physiological Correlates of Moral Decision-Making in the Professional Domain. Brain Sci. 2019, 9, 229.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop