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Sensory Attenuation in Sport and Rehabilitation: Perspective from Research in Parkinson’s Disease

1
School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
2
Centre for Human Brain Health, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Quincy J. Almeida
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(5), 580; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050580
Received: 20 March 2021 / Revised: 27 April 2021 / Accepted: 29 April 2021 / Published: 30 April 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Exercise and Brain Function—Series II)
People with Parkinson’s disease (PD) experience motor symptoms that are affected by sensory information in the environment. Sensory attenuation describes the modulation of sensory input caused by motor intent. This appears to be altered in PD and may index important sensorimotor processes underpinning PD symptoms. We review recent findings investigating sensory attenuation and reconcile seemingly disparate results with an emphasis on task-relevance in the modulation of sensory input. Sensory attenuation paradigms, across different sensory modalities, capture how two identical stimuli can elicit markedly different perceptual experiences depending on our predictions of the event, but also the context in which the event occurs. In particular, it appears as though contextual information may be used to suppress or facilitate a response to a stimulus on the basis of task-relevance. We support this viewpoint by considering the role of the basal ganglia in task-relevant sensory filtering and the use of contextual signals in complex environments to shape action and perception. This perspective highlights the dual effect of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD, whereby a reduced capacity to filter task-relevant signals harms the ability to integrate contextual cues, just when such cues are required to effectively navigate and interact with our environment. Finally, we suggest how this framework might be used to establish principles for effective rehabilitation in the treatment of PD. View Full-Text
Keywords: sensory attenuation; Parkinson’s disease; basal ganglia; motor control; rehabilitation sensory attenuation; Parkinson’s disease; basal ganglia; motor control; rehabilitation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kearney, J.; Brittain, J.-S. Sensory Attenuation in Sport and Rehabilitation: Perspective from Research in Parkinson’s Disease. Brain Sci. 2021, 11, 580. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050580

AMA Style

Kearney J, Brittain J-S. Sensory Attenuation in Sport and Rehabilitation: Perspective from Research in Parkinson’s Disease. Brain Sciences. 2021; 11(5):580. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050580

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kearney, Joshua, and John-Stuart Brittain. 2021. "Sensory Attenuation in Sport and Rehabilitation: Perspective from Research in Parkinson’s Disease" Brain Sciences 11, no. 5: 580. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050580

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