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Article

Cortical Function in Acute Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and at Recovery: A Longitudinal fMRI Case Study

1
Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, London, ON N6A3K7, Canada
2
Graduate Program in Neuroscience, Western University, London, ON N6A3K7, Canada
3
Department of Psychology, King’s University College at Western University, London, ON N6A3K7, Canada
4
Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, ON N6A3K7, Canada
5
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology and Department of Psychology, Western University, London, ON N6A3K7, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(9), 604; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090604
Received: 24 July 2020 / Revised: 22 August 2020 / Accepted: 1 September 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in the Study of Altered State of Consciousness)
Differences in the functional integrity of the brain from acute severe brain injury to subsequent recovery of consciousness have not been well documented. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may elucidate this issue as it allows for the objective measurement of brain function both at rest and in response to stimuli. Here, we report the cortical function of a patient with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a critically ill state and at subsequent functional recovery 9-months post injury. A series of fMRI paradigms were employed to assess sound and speech perception, command following, and resting state connectivity. The patient retained sound perception and speech perception acutely, as indexed by his fMRI responses. Command following was absent acutely, but was present at recovery. Increases in functional connectivity across multiple resting state networks were observed at recovery. We demonstrate the clinical utility of fMRI in assessing cortical function in a patient with severe TBI. We suggest that hallmarks of the recovery of consciousness are associated with neural activity to higher-order cognitive tasks and increased resting state connectivity. View Full-Text
Keywords: coma; consciousness; awareness; disorders of consciousness; traumatic brain injury coma; consciousness; awareness; disorders of consciousness; traumatic brain injury
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kazazian, K.; Norton, L.; Gofton, T.E.; Debicki, D.; Owen, A.M. Cortical Function in Acute Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and at Recovery: A Longitudinal fMRI Case Study. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 604. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090604

AMA Style

Kazazian K, Norton L, Gofton TE, Debicki D, Owen AM. Cortical Function in Acute Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and at Recovery: A Longitudinal fMRI Case Study. Brain Sciences. 2020; 10(9):604. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090604

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kazazian, Karnig, Loretta Norton, Teneille E. Gofton, Derek Debicki, and Adrian M. Owen. 2020. "Cortical Function in Acute Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and at Recovery: A Longitudinal fMRI Case Study" Brain Sciences 10, no. 9: 604. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10090604

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