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Article

Migraine Frequency Decrease Following Prolonged Medical Cannabis Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Faculty of Biology, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3200003, Israel
2
Institute of Pain Medicine, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa 3109601, Israel
3
Rappaport Faculty of Medicine-Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 3525433, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(6), 360; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10060360
Received: 13 May 2020 / Revised: 4 June 2020 / Accepted: 5 June 2020 / Published: 9 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cannabis: Neuropsychiatry and Its Effects on Brain and Behavior)
Background: Medical cannabis (MC) treatment for migraine is practically emerging, although sufficient clinical data are not available for this indication. This cross-sectional questionnaire-based study aimed to investigate the associations between phytocannabinoid treatment and migraine frequency. Methods: Participants were migraine patients licensed for MC treatment. Data included self-reported questionnaires and MC treatment features. Patients were retrospectively classified as responders vs. non-responders (≥50% vs. <50% decrease in monthly migraine attacks frequency following MC treatment initiation, respectively). Comparative statistics evaluated differences between these two subgroups. Results: A total of 145 patients (97 females, 67%) with a median MC treatment duration of three years were analyzed. Compared to non-responders, responders (n = 89, 61%) reported lower current migraine disability and lower negative impact, and lower rates of opioid and triptan consumption. Subgroup analysis demonstrated that responders consumed higher doses of the phytocannabinoid ms_373_15c and lower doses of the phytocannabinoid ms_331_18d (3.40 95% CI (1.10 to 12.00); p < 0.01 and 0.22 95% CI (0.05–0.72); p < 0.05, respectively). Conclusions: These findings indicate that MC results in long-term reduction of migraine frequency in >60% of treated patients and is associated with less disability and lower antimigraine medication intake. They also point to the MC composition, which may be potentially efficacious in migraine patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: cannabinoids; migraine: chronic pain; opioids; triptans; disability cannabinoids; migraine: chronic pain; opioids; triptans; disability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Aviram, J.; Vysotski, Y.; Berman, P.; Lewitus, G.M.; Eisenberg, E.; Meiri, D. Migraine Frequency Decrease Following Prolonged Medical Cannabis Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Study. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 360. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10060360

AMA Style

Aviram J, Vysotski Y, Berman P, Lewitus GM, Eisenberg E, Meiri D. Migraine Frequency Decrease Following Prolonged Medical Cannabis Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Study. Brain Sciences. 2020; 10(6):360. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10060360

Chicago/Turabian Style

Aviram, Joshua; Vysotski, Yelena; Berman, Paula; Lewitus, Gil M.; Eisenberg, Elon; Meiri, David. 2020. "Migraine Frequency Decrease Following Prolonged Medical Cannabis Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Study" Brain Sci. 10, no. 6: 360. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10060360

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