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Open AccessArticle

Brain Processing of Complex Geometric Forms in a Visual Memory Task Increases P2 Amplitude

1
Facultad de Psicología, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla 72000, PUE, Mexico
2
Instituto de Fisiología, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla 72592, PUE, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Brain Sci. 2020, 10(2), 114; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci10020114
Received: 28 December 2019 / Revised: 11 February 2020 / Accepted: 12 February 2020 / Published: 20 February 2020
(This article belongs to the Collection Collection on Cognitive Neuroscience)
We study the cognitive processing of visual working memory in three different conditions of memory load and configuration change. Altering this features has been shown to alter the brain’s processing in memory tasks. Most studies dealing with this issue have used the verbal-phonological modality. We use complex geometric polygons to assess visual working memory in a modified change detection task. Three different types of backgrounds were used to manipulate memory loading and 18 complex geometric polygons to manipulate stimuli configuration. The goal of our study was to test whether the memory load and configuration affect the correct-recall ratios. We expected that increasing visual items loading and changing configuration of items would induce differences in working memory performance. Brain activity related to the task was assessed through event-related potentials (ERP), during the test phase of each trial. Our results showed that visual items loading and changing of item configuration affect working memory on test phase on ERP component P2, but does not affect performance. However frontal related ERP component—P3—was minimally affected by visual memory loading or configuration changing, supporting that working memory is related to a filtering processing in posterior brain regions. View Full-Text
Keywords: visual working memory; interference effect; event related potentials visual working memory; interference effect; event related potentials
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cepeda-Freyre, H.A.; Garcia-Aguilar, G.; Eguibar, J.R.; Cortes, C. Brain Processing of Complex Geometric Forms in a Visual Memory Task Increases P2 Amplitude. Brain Sci. 2020, 10, 114.

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