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Open AccessArticle

Upper-Body Control and Mechanism of Humanoids to Compensate for Angular Momentum in the Yaw Direction Based on Human Running

by Takuya Otani 1,*,†, Kenji Hashimoto 2,3,†, Shunsuke Miyamae 4,†, Hiroki Ueta 4,†, Akira Natsuhara 4,†, Masanori Sakaguchi 5,†, Yasuo Kawakami 6,†, Hum-Ok Lim 3,7,† and Atsuo Takanishi 1,3,†
1
Department of Modern Mechanical Engineering, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480, Japan
2
Waseda Institute for Advanced Study, Waseda University, No. 41-304, 17 Kikui-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0044, Japan
3
Humanoid Robotics Institute (HRI), Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480, Japan
4
Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, No. 41-304, 17 Kikui-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-0044, Japan
5
ASICS Corporation, Institute of Sport Science, 6-2-1 Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe, 651-2271, Japan
6
Faculty of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, 2-579-15 Mikajima, Tokorozawa-shi, Tokyo 359-1192, Japan
7
Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, 3-27-1 Rokkakubashi, Kanagawa-ku, Yokohama 221-8686, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Appl. Sci. 2018, 8(1), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/app8010044
Received: 23 October 2017 / Revised: 25 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 3 January 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bio-Inspired Robotics)
Many extant studies proposed various stabilizing control methods for humanoids during the stance phase while hopping and running. Although these methods contribute to stability during hopping and running, humanoid robots do not swing their legs rapidly during the flight phase to prevent rotation in the yaw direction. Humans utilize their torsos and arms when running to compensate for the angular momentum in the yaw direction generated by leg movement during the flight phase. In this study, we developed an angular momentum control method based on human motion for a humanoid upper body. The method involves calculation of the angular momentum generated by the movement of the humanoid legs and calculation of the torso and arm motions required to compensate for the angular momentum of the legs in the yaw direction. We also developed a humanoid upper-body mechanism having human link length and mass properties, using carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic and a symmetric structure for generating large angular momentum. The humanoid robot developed in this study could generate almost the same angular momentum as that of a human. Furthermore, when suspended in midair, the humanoid robot achieved angular momentum compensation in the yaw direction. View Full-Text
Keywords: humanoid; angular momentum; flight phase; upper body humanoid; angular momentum; flight phase; upper body
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MDPI and ACS Style

Otani, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Miyamae, S.; Ueta, H.; Natsuhara, A.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kawakami, Y.; Lim, H.-O.; Takanishi, A. Upper-Body Control and Mechanism of Humanoids to Compensate for Angular Momentum in the Yaw Direction Based on Human Running. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 44.

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