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Article

Computer Assisted Surgery and 3D Printing in Orthopaedic Oncology: A Lesson Learned by Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery

1
IRCCS Istituto Ortopedico Rizzoli, Clinica Ortopedica III, 40136 Bologna, Italy
2
Unit of Orthodontics, Division of Dentistry IRCSS Ospedale San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy
3
Unit of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, 20132 Milan, Italy
4
Research Center for Oral Pathology and Implantology, Unit of Dentistry, IRCSS Ospedale San Raffaele, Scientific Institute, 20132 Milan, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Oleh Andrukhov
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(18), 8584; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188584
Received: 2 August 2021 / Revised: 31 August 2021 / Accepted: 8 September 2021 / Published: 15 September 2021
Primary bone sarcomas are rare tumors and surgical resection in combination with chemo and radiation therapy is the mainstay of treatment. Some specific anatomical sites still represent a reconstructive challenge due to their complex three-dimensional anatomy. In recent years, patient specific instruments along with 3D printing technology has come to represent innovative techniques in orthopaedic oncology. We retrospectively reviewed 23 patients affected by primary bone sarcoma treated with patient-specific instruments and 3D printing custom made prostheses. At follow up after approximately two years, the infection rate was 26%, mechanical complication rate 13%, and local recurrence rate 13% (with a five-years implant survival rate of 74%). Based on our experience, patient-specific instruments and 3D custom-made prostheses represents a reliable and safe technique for improving the accuracy of resection of primary bone tumour, with a particular use in pelvic surgery ameliorating functional results. View Full-Text
Keywords: computer assisted surgery; 3D printing; bone sarcomas computer assisted surgery; 3D printing; bone sarcomas
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MDPI and ACS Style

Bianchi, G.; Frisoni, T.; Spazzoli, B.; Lucchese, A.; Donati, D. Computer Assisted Surgery and 3D Printing in Orthopaedic Oncology: A Lesson Learned by Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 8584. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188584

AMA Style

Bianchi G, Frisoni T, Spazzoli B, Lucchese A, Donati D. Computer Assisted Surgery and 3D Printing in Orthopaedic Oncology: A Lesson Learned by Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Applied Sciences. 2021; 11(18):8584. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188584

Chicago/Turabian Style

Bianchi, Giuseppe, Tommaso Frisoni, Benedetta Spazzoli, Alessandra Lucchese, and Davide Donati. 2021. "Computer Assisted Surgery and 3D Printing in Orthopaedic Oncology: A Lesson Learned by Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery" Applied Sciences 11, no. 18: 8584. https://doi.org/10.3390/app11188584

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