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Open AccessReview

A Critical Review of SCWG in the Context of Available Gasification Technologies for Plastic Waste

1
Department of Chemistry “Ugo Schiff”, University of Florence, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, 50019 Florence, Italy
2
“Galileo Ferraris” Energy Department, Polytechnic of Turin, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129 Torino, Italy
3
Renewable Energy Consortium for Research and Demonstration-RE-CORD, Viale Kennedy 182, Scarperia e San Piero, 50038 Florence, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(18), 6307; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10186307
Received: 20 July 2020 / Revised: 21 August 2020 / Accepted: 5 September 2020 / Published: 10 September 2020
End of life packaging is nowadays one of the major environmental problems due to its short usage time, the low biodegradability, and the big volume occupied. In this context, gasification is one of the most promising chemical recycling techniques. Some non-recyclable or non-compostable waste gasification plants are already operating such as Enerkem Alberta Biofuels in Canada or the Sierra’s FastOx Pathfinder in California. In this review, we have examined works about plastic gasification from the last fifteen years with a specific focus on polyolefin (PP, PE), plastics mix, and co-gasification of plastic with biomass. For each of these, the best operating conditions were investigated. A very in-depth section was dedicated to supercritical water gasification (SCWG). The most used reactors in gasification processes are fluidized bed reactors together with air or steam as gasifying agents. Tar removal is commonly performed using olivine, dolomite, or nickel based catalysts. SCWG has numerous advantages including the inhibition of tar and coke formation and can be used to remove microplastics from the marine environment. In co-gasification of plastic material with coal or biomass, synergistic effects are observed between the raw materials, which improve the performance of the process, allowing to obtain higher gas yields and a syngas with a high energy content. View Full-Text
Keywords: gasification; waste plastics; packaging; recycling; polyolefins; plastic mix; supercritical water gasification; co-gasification; syngas; review gasification; waste plastics; packaging; recycling; polyolefins; plastic mix; supercritical water gasification; co-gasification; syngas; review
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Ciuffi, B.; Chiaramonti, D.; Rizzo, A.M.; Frediani, M.; Rosi, L. A Critical Review of SCWG in the Context of Available Gasification Technologies for Plastic Waste. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 6307.

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