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Soil Is Still an Unknown Biological System
Article

Plant Species-Dependent Effects of Liming and Plant Residue Incorporation on Soil Bacterial Community and Activity in an Acidic Orchard Soil

by 1,2, 1,2, 1,2, 2,* and 1,*
1
College of Horticulture, South China Agricultural University, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Microbial Signals and Disease Control, Guangdong Engineering Research Center for Litchi, Guangdong Engineering Research Center for Grass Science, Guangzhou 510642, China
2
Guangdong Institute of Microbiology Guangdong Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Applied Microbiology Southern China, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Microbial Culture Collection and Application, Guangzhou 510070, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(16), 5681; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165681
Received: 22 July 2020 / Revised: 9 August 2020 / Accepted: 13 August 2020 / Published: 15 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Factors Shaping the Soil Microbiome)
Both liming and plant residue incorporation are widely used practices for the amelioration of acidic soils—however, the difference in their effects is still not fully understood, especially regarding the microbial community. In this study, we took the acidic soils from a subtropical orchard as target soils, and implemented liming and plant residue incorporation with a leguminous and a gramineous cover crop as test plants. After six months of growth, soil pH, total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nutrient contents were determined, soil enzymes involving C, N, P cycling were assayed, and microbial communities were also analyzed using Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Results showed that liming was more effective in elevating soil pH, while plant residue incorporation exerted a more comprehensive influence—not only on soil pH, but also on soil enzyme activity and microbial community. PCR-DGGE analysis revealed that liming changed the microbial community structure more greatly than plant residue incorporation, while plant residue incorporation altered the microbial community composition much more than liming. The growth responses of test plants to liming and plant residue incorporation depended on plant species, indicating the necessity to select appropriate practice for a particular crop. A further, detailed investigation into the microbial community composition, and the respective functions using metagenomic approach, is also suggested. View Full-Text
Keywords: acidic soil improvement; liming; microbial community; plant residue incorporation; soil enzyme activity; subtropical orchard soil acidic soil improvement; liming; microbial community; plant residue incorporation; soil enzyme activity; subtropical orchard soil
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MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, X.; Feng, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, H.; Yao, Q. Plant Species-Dependent Effects of Liming and Plant Residue Incorporation on Soil Bacterial Community and Activity in an Acidic Orchard Soil. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 5681. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165681

AMA Style

Liu X, Feng Z, Zhou Y, Zhu H, Yao Q. Plant Species-Dependent Effects of Liming and Plant Residue Incorporation on Soil Bacterial Community and Activity in an Acidic Orchard Soil. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(16):5681. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165681

Chicago/Turabian Style

Liu, Xiaodi, Zengwei Feng, Yang Zhou, Honghui Zhu, and Qing Yao. 2020. "Plant Species-Dependent Effects of Liming and Plant Residue Incorporation on Soil Bacterial Community and Activity in an Acidic Orchard Soil" Applied Sciences 10, no. 16: 5681. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10165681

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