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Article

Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete with Coarse Recycled Aggregate Produced with Electric Arc Furnace Slag Concrete

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LADICIM (Laboratory of Materials Science and Engineering), University of Cantabria. E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Av./Los Castros 44, 39005 Santander, Spain
2
CERIS, DECivil, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal
3
INGECID S.L. (Ingeniería de la Construcción, Investigación y Desarrollo de Proyectos), E.T.S. de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Av./Los Castros 44, 39005 Santander, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(1), 216; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010216
Received: 19 November 2019 / Revised: 17 December 2019 / Accepted: 23 December 2019 / Published: 27 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue High-Performance Eco-Efficient Concrete)
The search for more sustainable construction materials, capable of complying with quality standards and current innovation policies, aimed at saving natural resources and reducing global pollution, is one of the greatest present societal challenges. In this study, an innovative recycled aggregate concrete (RAC) is designed and produced based on the use of a coarse recycled aggregate (CRA) crushing concrete with electric arc furnace slags as aggregate. These slags are a by-product of the steelmaking industry and their use, which avoids the use of natural aggregates, is a new trend in concrete and pavement technology. This paper has investigated the effects of incorporating this type of CRA in concrete at several replacement levels (0%, 20%, 50% and 100% by volume), by means of the physical, mechanical and durability characterization of the mixes. The analysis of the results has allowed the benefits and disadvantages of these new CRAs to be established, by comparing them with those of a natural aggregate concrete (NAC) mix (with 0% CRA incorporation) and with the data available in the literature for concrete made with more common CRA based on construction and demolition waste (CDW). Compared to NAC, similar compressive strength and tensile strength values for all replacement ratios have been obtained. The modulus of elasticity, the resistance to chloride penetration and the resistance to carbonation are less affected by these CRA than when CRA from CDW waste is used. Slight increases in bulk density over 7% were observed for total replacement. Overall, functionally good mechanical and durability properties have been obtained. View Full-Text
Keywords: recycled aggregate concrete; electric arc furnace slags; mechanical properties; durability recycled aggregate concrete; electric arc furnace slags; mechanical properties; durability
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tamayo, P.; Pacheco, J.; Thomas, C.; de Brito, J.; Rico, J. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete with Coarse Recycled Aggregate Produced with Electric Arc Furnace Slag Concrete. Appl. Sci. 2020, 10, 216. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010216

AMA Style

Tamayo P, Pacheco J, Thomas C, de Brito J, Rico J. Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete with Coarse Recycled Aggregate Produced with Electric Arc Furnace Slag Concrete. Applied Sciences. 2020; 10(1):216. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010216

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tamayo, Pablo; Pacheco, Joao; Thomas, Carlos; de Brito, Jorge; Rico, Jokin. 2020. "Mechanical and Durability Properties of Concrete with Coarse Recycled Aggregate Produced with Electric Arc Furnace Slag Concrete" Appl. Sci. 10, no. 1: 216. https://doi.org/10.3390/app10010216

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