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Article

The Study of Network Community Capacity to be a Subject: Digital Discursive Footprints

1
Laboratory of Speech Psychology and Psycholinguistics, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences; 13, Yaroslavskaya, Moscow 129366, Russia
2
Laboratory of Social and Economic Psychology, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences; 13, Yaroslavskaya, Moscow 129366, Russia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2019, 9(12), 119; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9120119
Received: 25 October 2019 / Revised: 18 November 2019 / Accepted: 19 November 2019 / Published: 21 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue XVI European Congress of Psychology)
The article is devoted to the assessment of the network community as a collective subject, as a group of interconnected and interdependent persons performing joint activities. According to the main research hypothesis, various forms of group subjectness, which determine its readiness for joint activities, are manifested in the discourse of the network community. Discourse constitutes a network community, mediates the interaction of its participants, represents ideas about the world, values, relationships, attitudes, sets patterns of behavior. A procedure is proposed for identifying discernible traces of the subjectness of a network community at various levels (lexical, semantic, content-analytical scales, etc.). The subjective structure of the network community is described based on experts’ implicit representations. The revealed components of the subjectness of network communities are compared with the characteristics of the subjectness of offline social groups. It is shown that the structure of the subjectness of network communities for some components is similar to the structure of the characteristics of the subjectness of offline social groups: the discourse of the network community represents a discussion of joint activities, group norms, and values, problems of civic identity. The specificity of network communities’ subjectness is revealed, which is manifested in the positive support of communication within the community, the identification and support of distinction between “us” and “them”. Two models of the relationship between discursive features and the construct “subjectness” are compared: additive-cumulative and additive. The equivalence of models is established based on the discriminativeness and the level of consistency with expert evaluation by external criteria. View Full-Text
Keywords: discourse; digital footprints; group reflexivity; network community; subjectness discourse; digital footprints; group reflexivity; network community; subjectness
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MDPI and ACS Style

Voronin, A.N.; Grebenschikova, T.A.; Kubrak, T.A.; Nestik, T.A.; Pavlova, N.D. The Study of Network Community Capacity to be a Subject: Digital Discursive Footprints. Behav. Sci. 2019, 9, 119. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9120119

AMA Style

Voronin AN, Grebenschikova TA, Kubrak TA, Nestik TA, Pavlova ND. The Study of Network Community Capacity to be a Subject: Digital Discursive Footprints. Behavioral Sciences. 2019; 9(12):119. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9120119

Chicago/Turabian Style

Voronin, Anatoly N., Taisiya A. Grebenschikova, Tina A. Kubrak, Timofey A. Nestik, and Natalya D. Pavlova. 2019. "The Study of Network Community Capacity to be a Subject: Digital Discursive Footprints" Behavioral Sciences 9, no. 12: 119. https://doi.org/10.3390/bs9120119

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