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Behav. Sci. 2018, 8(6), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs8060053

Violence Exposure and Mental Health of College Students in the United States

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
2
Center for Research on Ethnicity, Culture and Health, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 7 March 2018 / Revised: 3 May 2018 / Accepted: 20 May 2018 / Published: 24 May 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sexual Violence on College Campus)
Full-Text   |   PDF [262 KB, uploaded 24 May 2018]

Abstract

Background: Despite the well-established link between exposure to violence and mental health problems, less is known about this association among college students. The current study aimed to investigate the association between history of exposure to violence and mental health of American college students. Methods: Healthy Mind Study (HMS, 2016–2017) is a national online survey of 41,898 adult college students. The independent variable was lifetime history of exposure to violence (psychological, physical, and sexual). The dependent variables were anxiety, depression, and suicidality. Race, age, gender, sexual orientation, parental education, financial stress, transfer status, enrollment status, and graduate status were covariates. Linear and logistic regression models were used for data analysis. Results: History of exposure to violence was associated with all three aspects of poor mental health, namely general anxiety, depression, and suicidality. These associations were independent of covariates and type of abuse. Conclusions: There is a need to address various mental health needs of college students who have experienced various forms of violence. College students who screen positive for history of violence exposure should be evaluated for anxiety, depression, and suicidal behaviors. View Full-Text
Keywords: abuse; violence; sexual abuse; depression; anxiety; substance use; suicidal behaviors abuse; violence; sexual abuse; depression; anxiety; substance use; suicidal behaviors
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Assari, S.; Moghani Lankarani, M. Violence Exposure and Mental Health of College Students in the United States. Behav. Sci. 2018, 8, 53.

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