Next Article in Journal
Assessing Mothers’ Postpartum Depression From Their Infants’ Cry Vocalizations
Previous Article in Journal
The Relationship between Executive Functions and Language Production in 5–6-Year-Old Children: Insights from Working Memory and Storytelling
Open AccessArticle

Sleep in the Social World of College Students: Bridging Interpersonal Stress and Fear of Missing Out with Mental Health

1
Department of Human Development & Family Studies/Professor/College of Health Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02891, USA
2
Department of Psychology, Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA 24450, USA
3
Department of Psychology/College of Health Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02891, USA
4
Department of Human Development & Family Studies/College of Health Sciences, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02891, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Behav. Sci. 2020, 10(2), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/bs10020054
Received: 2 January 2020 / Revised: 31 January 2020 / Accepted: 4 February 2020 / Published: 6 February 2020
Introduction: The college years are characterized by psychosocial and biological phenomena that may impact mental health, such as heightened sensitivity to social stressors and compromises in sleep quantity and quality. The current study uses a biopsychosocial approach to examine the associations among interpersonal stress, Fear of Missing Out (FoMO), insomnia, and mental health. Methods: Survey data were collected from 283 undergraduate students (90% female) with a mean age of 21.4 years. A path analysis was utilized to test a mediational model linking interpersonal stress and FoMO with mental health through a mediator of insomnia. We hypothesized that higher levels of interpersonal stress and FoMO would be associated with higher levels of insomnia symptoms, which would in turn be associated with poorer mental health. Results: As predicted, insomnia partially mediated significant associations of interpersonal stress and FoMO with mental health. The association of interpersonal stress with insomnia and mental health was more robust than the association of FoMO with these variables. Conclusions: The pathway from interpersonal stress and/or FoMO, through insomnia, to compromises in mental health may be modifiable through behavioral interventions focusing on coping skills, sleep hygiene, and even technology-related habit changes. Recommendations to help disrupt this pathway, particularly among college students, are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep; adolescents; FoMO; stress; mental health sleep; adolescents; FoMO; stress; mental health
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Adams, S.K.; Murdock, K.K.; Daly-Cano, M.; Rose, M. Sleep in the Social World of College Students: Bridging Interpersonal Stress and Fear of Missing Out with Mental Health. Behav. Sci. 2020, 10, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop