Next Article in Journal
Comparison of Computerized Cardiotocography Parameters between Male and Female Fetuses
Next Article in Special Issue
A Review of Second- and Third-line Infertility Treatments and Supporting Evidence in Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Previous Article in Journal
Real-World Experiences with Pazopanib in Patients with Advanced Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma in Northern California
Open AccessReview

Generational Health Impact of PCOS on Women and Their Children

by Roger Hart 1,2,3
1
Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical School, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
2
Fertility Specialists of Western Australia, Bethesda Hospital, 25 Queenslea Drive, Claremont, WA 6010, Australia
3
Division of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, King Edward Memorial Hospital, Subiaco, Perth, WA 6008, Australia
Med. Sci. 2019, 7(3), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/medsci7030049
Received: 2 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 12 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Polycystic Ovary Syndrome)
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic disorder with reproductive consequences. Hence, the synergy of the dual maternal challenges of difficulties with conception, set on a background of metabolic disorder and inflammation, understandably leads to increased obstetric risk for the woman. Furthermore, she is more likely than her peers to require assistance with conception, either through induction of ovulation with the attendant risk of a multiple gestation, or in vitro fertilization (IVF) with its recognized increased obstetric risk for woman and her child. The increased obstetric risk for a woman with PCOS is manifested with an increased rate of miscarriage, gestational diabetes, hypertensive disorder and premature delivery. These obstetric complications are due to impairment of placental function, systemic inflammation and metabolic disorder and are markers for the woman herself of her predisposition to cardiometabolic disorder in later life. Consequently, it is inevitable that this environment may induce changes in the fetus during pregnancy, leading to an intergenerational risk from maternal PCOS. View Full-Text
Keywords: PCOS; offspring; children; pregnancy; prematurity; gestational diabetes; pre-eclampsia; congenital malformations; intergeneration PCOS; offspring; children; pregnancy; prematurity; gestational diabetes; pre-eclampsia; congenital malformations; intergeneration
MDPI and ACS Style

Hart, R. Generational Health Impact of PCOS on Women and Their Children. Med. Sci. 2019, 7, 49.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop