Next Article in Journal
A Problem-Based Learning Approach Enhancing Students’ Awareness of Natural Risks and Hazards in Italian Schools
Next Article in Special Issue
A Validation of ERA5 Reanalysis Data in the Southern Antarctic Peninsula—Ellsworth Land Region, and Its Implications for Ice Core Studies
Previous Article in Journal
On the Predictability of 30-Day Global Mesoscale Simulations of African Easterly Waves during Summer 2006: A View with the Generalized Lorenz Model
Previous Article in Special Issue
Back to the Future: Using Long-Term Observational and Paleo-Proxy Reconstructions to Improve Model Projections of Antarctic Climate
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle

Regional Climate Change Recorded in Moss Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes from a Late Holocene Peat Archive in the Western Antarctic Peninsula

Lehigh University, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Geosciences 2019, 9(7), 282; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9070282
Received: 15 May 2019 / Revised: 19 June 2019 / Accepted: 22 June 2019 / Published: 26 June 2019
  |  
PDF [8013 KB, uploaded 26 June 2019]
  |  

Abstract

The Antarctic Peninsula (AP) climate is characterized by a high degree of variability, which poses a problem when attempting to put modern change in the context of natural variation. Therefore, novel methods are required to disentangle sometimes conflicting climate records from the region. In recent years, the development of Antarctic moss-cellulose isotopes as a proxy for summer terrestrial growing conditions has become more widespread, with the isotopes Δ13C and δ18O reflecting moss productivity and peatbank moisture conditions, respectively. Here, we used a combined Δ13C and δ18O isotope analysis of moss Chorisodontium aciphyllum cellulose from a peatbank located on Litchfield Island in the western AP to document changes in climate over the last 1700 years. High Δ13C values (>15‰) indicate warm and productive conditions on Litchfield Island from 1600 to 1350 cal yr BP (350 to 600 AD) and over the last 100 years. The δ18O record shows two distinct intervals of dry conditions at 1350–1000 cal yr BP (600–950 AD) and at 500–0 cal yr BP (1450–1950 AD). Our record indicates that terrestrial ecosystems in the AP have responded to regional climate driven by atmospheric circulation, such as the southern annular mode (SAM) and, to a lesser extent, changes in ocean circulation. View Full-Text
Keywords: stable isotopes; paleoclimate; Antarctic Peninsula; hydroclimate; temperature; Chorisodontium aciphyllum stable isotopes; paleoclimate; Antarctic Peninsula; hydroclimate; temperature; Chorisodontium aciphyllum
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Stelling, J.M.; Yu, Z. Regional Climate Change Recorded in Moss Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes from a Late Holocene Peat Archive in the Western Antarctic Peninsula. Geosciences 2019, 9, 282.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Geosciences EISSN 2076-3263 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top