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Animals 2019, 9(4), 155; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani9040155

Potential of Insect Meals as Protein Sources for Meat-Type Ducks Based on In Vitro Digestibility

1
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
2
Department of Applied Science, Faculty of Science, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
3
Innovation Cluster 2, Thailand Science Park, Ministry of Science and Technology, Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand
4
Department of Agriculture, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
5
The Queen Sirikit Department of Sericulture, Ministry of Agriculture and Cooperatives, Bangkok 10900, Thailand
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 27 March 2019 / Accepted: 28 March 2019 / Published: 9 April 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Insects: Alternative Protein Source for Animal Feed)
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Simple Summary

There has been a dramatic increase in duck meat consumption. As a result, ducks are an interesting alternative type of livestock. Animal-based proteins such as fishmeal and animal by-products are valuable nutrients with high digestibility, but they are associated with cost fluctuations, pathogen contamination, and environmental impacts. Therefore, plant-based proteins are used, but they have the disadvantages of inappropriate amino acid profiles, anti-nutritional factors, and mycotoxin contamination. Insect meal contains favorable nutrients and low production costs and is environmentally friendly; however, there is a large number of insect species. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to screen insects for their potential use as a protein source in the duck diet. Insect meal with a high proportion of low-digestible components was shown to have low digestibility. In conclusion, yellow mealworm larvae, giant mealworm larvae, lesser wax moth larvae, house fly larvae, mulberry silkworm pupae, and American cockroach nymph have the potential to be alternative protein sources for ducks.

Abstract

There has been a dramatic increase in duck meat consumption. As a result, ducks are an interesting alternative type of livestock. Animal-based proteins such as fishmeal and animal by-products are valuable nutrients with high digestibility, but they are associated with cost fluctuations, pathogen contamination, and environmental impacts. Therefore, plant-based proteins are used, but they have the disadvantages of inappropriate amino acid profiles, anti-nutritional factors, and mycotoxin contamination. Insect meal contains favorable nutrients and low production costs and is environmentally friendly; however, there is a large number of insect species. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation is to screen insects for their potential use as a protein source in the duck diet. Insect meal with a high proportion of low-digestible components was shown to have low digestibility. Yellow mealworm larvae, giant mealworm larvae, lesser wax moth larvae, house fly larvae, mulberry silkworm pupae, and American cockroach nymph have the potential to be alternative protein sources for ducks. Insect meal has been widely studied and is used in animal nutrition to replace common protein sources that have several disadvantages and to promote sustainability in animal production. Two-step in vitro digestibility using crude enzyme extracts from digestive tracts of meat-type ducks (Cherry Valley) was performed on general protein sources and insect meals to compare the in vitro digestibility of organic matter (OMd) and crude protein (CPd). Variation in chemical components between different types of insect meal was found. A positive correlation was found between OMd and the ether extract composition in insect meal, whereas a negative correlation was shown between crude fiber and acid detergent fiber. Contrasting relationships were found between CPd and crude fiber and acid detergent fiber in insect meal. In conclusion, the yellow mealworm larvae (Tenebrio molitor), giant mealworm larvae (Zophobas morio), lesser wax moth larvae (Achroia grisella), house fly larvae (Musca domestica), mulberry silkworm pupae (Bombyx mori), and American cockroach nymph (Periplaneta americana) are potential protein sources for ducks based on OMd and CPd digestibility after screening with an in vitro digestibility technique. View Full-Text
Keywords: cherry valley; cricket; crude protein; fruit fly; Hermetia illucens; house fly; locust; mealworm; silkworm cherry valley; cricket; crude protein; fruit fly; Hermetia illucens; house fly; locust; mealworm; silkworm
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Kovitvadhi, A.; Chundang, P.; Thongprajukaew, K.; Tirawattanawanich, C.; Srikachar, S.; Chotimanothum, B. Potential of Insect Meals as Protein Sources for Meat-Type Ducks Based on In Vitro Digestibility. Animals 2019, 9, 155.

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