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Open AccessArticle

Increased Rider Weight Did Not Induce Changes in Behavior and Physiological Parameters in Horses

1
Department of Animal Science, Aarhus University, Blichers Allé 20, 8830 Tjele, Denmark
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Agrocampus Ouest, 65 Rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes, France
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Department of Anatomy, Physiology and Biochemistry, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7011, 75007 Uppsala, Sweden
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Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Veterinary Medicine, Veterinärplatz 1, A-1210 Vienna, Austria
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Vejle Hestepraksis, Fasanvej 12, 7120 Vejle Oest, Denmark
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Animals 2020, 10(1), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/ani10010095 (registering DOI)
Received: 2 December 2019 / Revised: 29 December 2019 / Accepted: 1 January 2020 / Published: 6 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Welfare)
The influence of rider weight on horse welfare, health and performance is often debated. We measured the effects of increasing the weight of the regular rider by 15% and 25% on horse behavior, gait symmetry and physiological responses in a standard dressage test. Cortisol levels increased in response to exercise, but we found no effect of the weight treatment, i.e., cortisol levels did not increase when the rider became heavier. Behavior, heart rate and gait symmetry also did not differ between treatments. We conclude that increasing the weight of the regular rider by 15% and 25% did not result in significant short-term alterations in cortisol, heart rate, behavior and gait symmetry in horses during low-intensity exercise. Further studies are required to develop appropriate guidelines for rider weight.
Recent studies have reported significant alterations in horse physiological and gait parameters when exposed to increased rider weight during moderate to high intensity exercise. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of increased rider weight (+15% and +25% of the regular rider’s bodyweight) on horse behavioral, physiological and gait symmetry parameters during a standard dressage test. Twenty rider-horse equipages performed the same test three times in a randomized, crossover design. Salivary cortisol (SC), heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), behavior and gait symmetry (GS) were measured. SC concentrations increased from baseline (p < 0.001), but there was no significant treatment effect (difference from baseline (ng/mL): Control: 0.21 ± 0.1; +15%: 0.37 ± 0.1; +25%: 0.45 ± 0.2, p = 0.52). Similarly, there were no overall treatment effects on HR or HRV variables (avg HR across treatments (bpm): 105.3 ± 1.3), nor on GS parameters. There was large individual variation in conflict behavior but no effect of weight treatment. We conclude that increasing the weight of the regular rider by 15% and 25% did not result in significant short-term alterations in the measured parameters. Maximum rider:horse weight ratios were 15–23% and the exercise intensity was relatively low; thus the results should not be extrapolated to other weight ratios and exercise intensities. View Full-Text
Keywords: behavior; dressage horse; gait symmetry; rider weight; saliva cortisol; welfare behavior; dressage horse; gait symmetry; rider weight; saliva cortisol; welfare
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Christensen, J.W.; Bathellier, S.; Rhodin, M.; Palme, R.; Uldahl, M. Increased Rider Weight Did Not Induce Changes in Behavior and Physiological Parameters in Horses. Animals 2020, 10, 95.

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