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Article

Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analyses Reveal the Presence of a Putative Bacterial Endosymbiont in an Avian Nasal Mite (Rhinonyssidae; Mesostigmata)

1
Department of Biology, University of Nevada, 1664 N Virginia St, Reno, NV 89557, USA
2
Illinois Natural History Survey, Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Champaign, IL 61820, USA
3
Departamento de Biología Animal, Universitario de Cartuja, Calle Prof. Vicente Callao, 3, 18011 Granada, Spain
4
Department of Microbiology and Parasitology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Universidad de Sevilla, Calle San Fernando, 4, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kirill Sharshov
Microorganisms 2021, 9(8), 1734; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081734
Received: 12 July 2021 / Revised: 9 August 2021 / Accepted: 10 August 2021 / Published: 14 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Avian Pathogens)
Rhinonyssidae (Mesostigmata) is a family of nasal mites only found in birds. All species are hematophagous endoparasites, which may damage the nasal cavities of birds, and also could be potential reservoirs or vectors of other infections. However, the role of members of Rhinonyssidae as disease vectors in wild bird populations remains uninvestigated, with studies of the microbiomes of Rhinonyssidae being almost non-existent. In the nasal mite (Tinaminyssus melloi) from rock doves (Columba livia), a previous study found evidence of a highly abundant putatively endosymbiotic bacteria from Class Alphaproteobacteria. Here, we expanded the sample size of this species (two different hosts- ten nasal mites from two independent samples per host), incorporated contamination controls, and increased sequencing depth in shotgun sequencing and genome-resolved metagenomic analyses. Our goal was to increase the information regarding this mite species and its putative endosymbiont. We obtained a metagenome assembled genome (MAG) that was estimated to be 98.1% complete and containing only 0.9% possible contamination. Moreover, the MAG has characteristics typical of endosymbionts (namely, small genome size an AT bias). Overall, our results support the presence of a potential endosymbiont, which is the first described for avian nasal mites to date, and improve the overall understanding of the microbiota inhabiting these mites. View Full-Text
Keywords: Rhinonyssidae; endosymbiont; metagenomic; Brucella Rhinonyssidae; endosymbiont; metagenomic; Brucella
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MDPI and ACS Style

Osuna-Mascaró, C.; Doña, J.; Johnson, K.P.; de Rojas, M. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analyses Reveal the Presence of a Putative Bacterial Endosymbiont in an Avian Nasal Mite (Rhinonyssidae; Mesostigmata). Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1734. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081734

AMA Style

Osuna-Mascaró C, Doña J, Johnson KP, de Rojas M. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analyses Reveal the Presence of a Putative Bacterial Endosymbiont in an Avian Nasal Mite (Rhinonyssidae; Mesostigmata). Microorganisms. 2021; 9(8):1734. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081734

Chicago/Turabian Style

Osuna-Mascaró, Carolina, Jorge Doña, Kevin P. Johnson, and Manuel de Rojas. 2021. "Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analyses Reveal the Presence of a Putative Bacterial Endosymbiont in an Avian Nasal Mite (Rhinonyssidae; Mesostigmata)" Microorganisms 9, no. 8: 1734. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9081734

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