Next Article in Journal
First Molecular Detection of Polychromophilus Parasites in Brazilian Bat Species
Next Article in Special Issue
The Respiratory Commensal Bacterium Dolosigranulum pigrum 040417 Improves the Innate Immune Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae
Previous Article in Journal
Viruses Like Sugars: How to Assess Glycan Involvement in Viral Attachment
Previous Article in Special Issue
Probiotic Potential and Cholesterol-Lowering Capabilities of Bacterial Strains Isolated from Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae ‘Chachiensis’
Communication

Exogenous Polyamines Influence In Vitro Microbial Adhesion to Human Mucus According to the Age of Mucus Donor

1
Functional Foods Forum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland
2
Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), 46980 Valencia, Spain
3
Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, School of Medicine, University of Eastern Finland, 70211 Kuopio, Finland
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Haruki Kitazawa and Julio Villena
Microorganisms 2021, 9(6), 1239; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061239
Received: 27 April 2021 / Revised: 26 May 2021 / Accepted: 5 June 2021 / Published: 7 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Probiotics for Next Generations)
Adhesion to intestinal mucus is the first step for microbiota colonization in early life. Polyamines are polycations with important physiological functions in both procaryotic and eucaryotic cells. However, their role in intestinal mucus adhesion is not known. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether exogenous polyamines (putrescine, spermidine, spermine, and their combination) would alter the adhesive properties of Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), Bifidobacterium animalis subs. lactis Bb12, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Escherichia coli. Human intestinal mucus was isolated from healthy infants (0–6-month-old and 6–12-month-old) and healthy adults (25–52 years old). Spermidine significantly increased Bb12 adhesion (p < 0.05) in the mucus of infants (0–6 months) but reduced the adhesion of LGG in adult mucus (p < 0.05) with no significant effect in any of the infant groups. Spermine was more effective than polyamine combinations in reducing C. sakazakii (p < 0.05) adhesion in early infant mucus (0–6 months). The adhesion ability of E. coli remained unaffected by exogenous polyamines at any age in the concentrations tested. Our data suggest that polyamines may modulate the bacterial adhesion to mucus depending on the bacterial strain and depending at what age the mucus has been generated. View Full-Text
Keywords: Bifidobacterium; Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus; Cronobacter; putrescine; spermidine; spermine; polyamines Bifidobacterium; Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus; Cronobacter; putrescine; spermidine; spermine; polyamines
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Mantziari, A.; Mannila, E.; Collado, M.C.; Salminen, S.; Gómez-Gallego, C. Exogenous Polyamines Influence In Vitro Microbial Adhesion to Human Mucus According to the Age of Mucus Donor. Microorganisms 2021, 9, 1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061239

AMA Style

Mantziari A, Mannila E, Collado MC, Salminen S, Gómez-Gallego C. Exogenous Polyamines Influence In Vitro Microbial Adhesion to Human Mucus According to the Age of Mucus Donor. Microorganisms. 2021; 9(6):1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061239

Chicago/Turabian Style

Mantziari, Anastasia, Enni Mannila, Maria C. Collado, Seppo Salminen, and Carlos Gómez-Gallego. 2021. "Exogenous Polyamines Influence In Vitro Microbial Adhesion to Human Mucus According to the Age of Mucus Donor" Microorganisms 9, no. 6: 1239. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9061239

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop