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Article

Assessing the Effect of Humic Substances and Fe(III) as Potential Electron Acceptors for Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Marine Anoxic System

1
Department of Marine Microbiology and Biogeochemistry, NIOZ Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Utrecht University, 1797 SZ ’t Horntje, Texel, The Netherlands
2
Department of Earth Sciences, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3584 CB Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(9), 1288; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091288
Received: 15 July 2020 / Revised: 6 August 2020 / Accepted: 17 August 2020 / Published: 24 August 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Anaerobes in Biogeochemical Cycles)
Marine anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM) is generally assumed to be coupled to sulfate reduction, via a consortium of anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). ANME-1 are, however, often found as single cells, or only loosely aggregated with SRB, suggesting they perform a form of AOM independent of sulfate reduction. Oxidized metals and humic substances have been suggested as potential electron acceptors for ANME, but up to now, AOM linked to reduction of these compounds has only been shown for the ANME-2 and ANME-3 clades. Here, the effect of the electron acceptors anthraquinone-disulfonate (AQDS), a humic acids analog, and Fe3+ on anaerobic methane oxidation were assessed by incubation experiments with anoxic Black Sea water containing ANME-1b. Incubation experiments with 13C-methane and AQDS showed a stimulating effect of AQDS on methane oxidation. Fe3+ enhanced the ANME-1b abundance but did not substantially increase methane oxidation. Sodium molybdate, which was added as an inhibitor of sulfate reduction, surprisingly enhanced methane oxidation, possibly related to the dominant abundance of Sulfurospirillum in those incubations. The presented data suggest the potential involvement of ANME-1b in AQDS-enhanced anaerobic methane oxidation, possibly via electron shuttling to AQDS or via interaction with other members of the microbial community. View Full-Text
Keywords: ANME-1; anaerobic methane oxidation; Black Sea; AQDS; Fe(III); humic substances ANME-1; anaerobic methane oxidation; Black Sea; AQDS; Fe(III); humic substances
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MDPI and ACS Style

van Grinsven, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Villanueva, L. Assessing the Effect of Humic Substances and Fe(III) as Potential Electron Acceptors for Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Marine Anoxic System. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1288. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091288

AMA Style

van Grinsven S, Sinninghe Damsté JS, Villanueva L. Assessing the Effect of Humic Substances and Fe(III) as Potential Electron Acceptors for Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Marine Anoxic System. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(9):1288. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091288

Chicago/Turabian Style

van Grinsven, Sigrid, Jaap S. Sinninghe Damsté, and Laura Villanueva. 2020. "Assessing the Effect of Humic Substances and Fe(III) as Potential Electron Acceptors for Anaerobic Methane Oxidation in a Marine Anoxic System" Microorganisms 8, no. 9: 1288. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8091288

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