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Open AccessArticle

The Prokaryotic Microbiome of Acropora digitifera is Stable under Short-Term Artificial Light Pollution

1
Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines
2
Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel
3
Israel The H. Steinitz Marine Biology Laboratory, The Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences of Eilat, P.O. Box 469, Eilat 88103, Israel
4
Porter School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 39040, Israel
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(10), 1566; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101566
Received: 29 July 2020 / Revised: 5 October 2020 / Accepted: 9 October 2020 / Published: 12 October 2020
Corals harbor a great diversity of symbiotic microorganisms that play pivotal roles in host nutrition, reproduction, and development. Changes in the ocean environment, such as increasing exposure to artificial light at night (ALAN), may alter these relationships and result in a decline in coral health. In this study, we examined the microbiome associated with gravid specimens of the reef-building coral Acropora digitifera. We also assessed the temporal effects of ALAN on the coral-associated microbial community using high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene V4 hypervariable region. The A. digitifera microbial community was dominated by phyla Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Exposure to ALAN had no large-scale effect on the coral microbiome, although taxa affiliated with Rhodobacteraceae, Caulobacteraceae, Burkholderiaceae, Lachnospiraceae, and Ruminococcaceae were significantly enriched in corals subjected to ALAN. We further noted an increase in the relative abundance of the family Endozoicomonadaceae (Endozoicomonas) as the spawning period approached, regardless of light treatment. These findings highlight the stability of the A. digitifera microbial community under short-term artificial light pollution and provide initial insights into the response of the collective holobiont to ALAN. View Full-Text
Keywords: 16S rRNA gene; acroporid; coral-associated microbes; ecological light pollution; Endozoicomonadaceae; holobiont 16S rRNA gene; acroporid; coral-associated microbes; ecological light pollution; Endozoicomonadaceae; holobiont
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Baquiran, J.I.P.; Nada, M.A.L.; Campos, C.L.D.; Sayco, S.L.G.; Cabaitan, P.C.; Rosenberg, Y.; Ayalon, I.; Levy, O.; Conaco, C. The Prokaryotic Microbiome of Acropora digitifera is Stable under Short-Term Artificial Light Pollution. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1566.

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