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Article

Microbiome Management by Biological and Chemical Treatments in Maize Is Linked to Plant Health

1
Institute of Environmental Biotechnology, Graz University of Technology, 8010 Graz, Austria
2
Division of Microbiology, ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi 110012, India
3
Biotenzz GmbH, 8010 Graz, Austria
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally.
Microorganisms 2020, 8(10), 1506; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101506
Received: 19 August 2020 / Revised: 25 September 2020 / Accepted: 29 September 2020 / Published: 30 September 2020
The targeted application of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) provides the key for a future sustainable agriculture with reduced pesticide application. PGPR interaction with the indigenous microbiota is poorly understood, but essential to develop reliable applications. Therefore, Stenotrophomonas rhizophila SPA-P69 was applied as a seed coating and in combination with a fungicide based on the active ingredients fludioxonil, metalaxyl-M, captan and ziram. The plant performances and rhizosphere compositions of treated and non-treated maize plants of two field trials were analyzed. Plant health was significantly increased by treatment; however, overall corn yield was not changed. By applying high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA and the ITS genes, the bacterial and fungal changes in the rhizosphere due to different treatments were determined. Despite the fact that treatments had a significant impact on the rhizosphere microbiota (9–12%), the field site was identified as the main driver (27–37%). The soil microbiota composition from each site was significantly different, which explains the site-specific effects. In this study we were able to show the first indications how PGPR treatments increase plant health via microbiome shifts in a site-specific manner. This way, first steps towards a detailed understanding of PGPRs and developments of consistently efficient applications in diverse environments are made. View Full-Text
Keywords: Zea mays; maize; corn; rhizosphere; 16S rRNA gene; ITS; fungicide; plant growth promoting rhizobacteria Zea mays; maize; corn; rhizosphere; 16S rRNA gene; ITS; fungicide; plant growth promoting rhizobacteria
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kusstatscher, P.; Wicaksono, W.A.; Thenappan, D.P.; Adam, E.; Müller, H.; Berg, G. Microbiome Management by Biological and Chemical Treatments in Maize Is Linked to Plant Health. Microorganisms 2020, 8, 1506. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101506

AMA Style

Kusstatscher P, Wicaksono WA, Thenappan DP, Adam E, Müller H, Berg G. Microbiome Management by Biological and Chemical Treatments in Maize Is Linked to Plant Health. Microorganisms. 2020; 8(10):1506. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101506

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kusstatscher, Peter, Wisnu A. Wicaksono, Dhivya P. Thenappan, Eveline Adam, Henry Müller, and Gabriele Berg. 2020. "Microbiome Management by Biological and Chemical Treatments in Maize Is Linked to Plant Health" Microorganisms 8, no. 10: 1506. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms8101506

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