Next Article in Journal
Editorial for the Special Issue: Thermophiles and Thermozymes
Next Article in Special Issue
Probiotics and Colon Cancer
Previous Article in Journal
Correction: Hokynar, K. et al. Chlamydia-Like Organisms (CLOs) in Finnish Ixodes ricinus Ticks and Human Skin. Microorganisms 2016, 4, 28
Previous Article in Special Issue
Effects of Bifidobacterium bifidum in Mice Infected with Citrobacter rodentium
Article Menu
Issue 2 (February) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Microorganisms 2019, 7(2), 61; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7020061

Refined versus Extra Virgin Olive Oil High-Fat Diet Impact on Intestinal Microbiota of Mice and Its Relation to Different Physiological Variables

1
Área de Microbiología, Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Jaén, Paraje de Las Lagunillas s/n, Jaén 23072, Spain
2
Área de Fisiología, Departamento de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad de Jaén, Paraje de Las Lagunillas s/n, Jaén 23072, Spain
3
Departamento de Estadística e Investigación Operativa, Universidad de Jaén, Paraje de Las Lagunillas s/n, Jaén 23072, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 27 January 2019 / Revised: 16 February 2019 / Accepted: 20 February 2019 / Published: 23 February 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Gastrointestinal Microbiota Impacts Human Health and Disease)
Full-Text   |   PDF [1458 KB, uploaded 23 February 2019]   |  

Abstract

Extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) has been reported to have a distinct influence on gut microbiota in comparison to other fats, with its physiological benefits widely studied. However, a large proportion of the population consumes olive oil after a depurative process that not only mellows its taste, but also deprives it of polyphenols and other minority components. In this study, we compare the influence on the intestinal microbiota of a diet high in this refined olive oil (ROO) with other fat-enriched diets. Swiss Webster mice were fed standard or a high-fat diet enriched with EVOO, ROO, or butter (BT). Physiological parameters were also evaluated. At the end of the feeding period, DNA was extracted from feces and the 16S rRNA was pyrosequenced. The group fed ROO behaved differently to the EVOO group in half the families with statistically significant differences among the diets, with higher comparative levels in three families—Desulfovibrionaceae, Spiroplasmataceae, and Helicobacteraceae—correlating with total cholesterol. These results are again indicative of a link between specific diets, certain physiological parameters and the prevalence of some taxa, but also support the possibility that polyphenols and minor components of EVOO are involved in some of the proposed effects of this fat through the modulation of the intestinal microbiota View Full-Text
Keywords: olive oil; polyphenols; butter; next generation sequencing; gut microbiota olive oil; polyphenols; butter; next generation sequencing; gut microbiota
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).

Supplementary material

SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Martínez, N.; Prieto, I.; Hidalgo, M.; Segarra, A.B.; Martínez-Rodríguez, A.M.; Cobo, A.; Ramírez, M.; Gálvez, A.; Martínez-Cañamero, M. Refined versus Extra Virgin Olive Oil High-Fat Diet Impact on Intestinal Microbiota of Mice and Its Relation to Different Physiological Variables. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 61.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Microorganisms EISSN 2076-2607 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top