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Characterization of INS-15, A Metalloprotease Potentially Involved in the Invasion of Cryptosporidium parvum
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Cryptosporidium Prevalence in Calves and Geese Co-Grazing on Four Livestock Farms Surrounding Two Reservoirs Supplying Public Water to Mainland Orkney, Scotland

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Moredun Research Institute, Pentlands Science Park, Penicuik, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK
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Scottish Natural Heritage, 54-56 Junction Road, Kirkwall, Orkney KW15 1AG, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2019, 7(11), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7110513
Received: 4 October 2019 / Revised: 28 October 2019 / Accepted: 29 October 2019 / Published: 30 October 2019
The parasite Cryptosporidium parvum represents a threat to livestock health and production, water quality and public health. Cattle are known to be significant reservoirs of C. parvum, but transmission routes are complex and recent studies have implicated the potential role of wildlife in parasite transmission to cattle and water sources. On the Orkney Isles, high densities of Greylag geese (Anser anser) cause widespread faecal contamination of cattle pastures, where cryptosporidiosis is known to be the main cause of neonatal calf diarrhoea and Cryptosporidium contamination frequently occurs in two reservoirs supplying Mainland Orkney’s public water. This study aimed to determine the Cryptosporidium species and subtypes present in geese and calves co-grazing on four farms surrounding two reservoirs on Mainland Orkney. Results indicated a high level of C. parvum prevalence in calves, geese and water samples. gp60 analysis illustrated that higher genotypic diversity was present in the goose population compared with calves, but did not yield sequence results for any of the water samples. It can be concluded that the high levels of C. parvum evident in calves, geese and water samples tested represents a significant risk to water quality and public health. View Full-Text
Keywords: Cryptosporidium parvum; calves; geese; catchments; public health Cryptosporidium parvum; calves; geese; catchments; public health
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Wells, B.; Paton, C.; Bacchetti, R.; Shaw, H.; Stewart, W.; Plowman, J.; Katzer, F.; Innes, E.A. Cryptosporidium Prevalence in Calves and Geese Co-Grazing on Four Livestock Farms Surrounding Two Reservoirs Supplying Public Water to Mainland Orkney, Scotland. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 513.

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