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Effect of Temperatures Used in Food Storage on Duration of Heat Stress Induced Invasiveness of L. monocytogenes

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Department of Food Hygiene and Consumer Health Protection, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, 50-375 Wrocław, Poland
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Department of Microbiology, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, Collegium Medicum of L. Rydygier in Bydgoszcz, 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
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Department of Theoretical Foundations of Biomedical Sciences and Medical Computer Science, Nicolaus Copernicus University in Toruń, L. Rydygier Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, 9 M. Skłodowska-Curie St., 85-094 Bydgoszcz, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2019, 7(10), 467; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms7100467
Received: 16 July 2019 / Revised: 31 August 2019 / Accepted: 17 October 2019 / Published: 17 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Food Microbiology)
The unpropitious conditions of the food processing environment trigger in Listeria monocytogenes stress response mechanisms that may affect the pathogen’s virulence. To date, many studies have revealed that acid, osmotic, heat, cold and oxidative stress modify invasiveness of L. monocytogenes. Nonetheless, there is limited data on the duration of the stress effect on bacterial invasiveness. Since most food is stored at low or room temperatures we studied the impact of these temperatures on the duration of heat stress effect on invasiveness of 8 L. monocytogenes strains. Bacteria were heat-treated for 20 min at 54 °C and then incubated at 5 and 20 °C up to 14 days. A decrease in invasiveness over time was observed for bacteria not exposed to heating. It was found that heat shock significantly reduced the invasion capacity of all strains and the effect lasted between 7 and 14 days at both 5 and 20 °C. In conclusion, 20-min heating reduces invasion capacity of all L. monocytogenes strains; however, the stress effect is temporary and lasts between 7 and 14 days in the food storage conditions. The invasiveness of bacteria changes along with the incubation time and is temperature-dependent. View Full-Text
Keywords: Listeria monocytogenes; heat stress; invasiveness; food storage temperature Listeria monocytogenes; heat stress; invasiveness; food storage temperature
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Wałecka-Zacharska, E.; Korkus, J.; Skowron, K.; Wietlicka-Piszcz, M.; Kosek-Paszkowska, K.; Bania, J. Effect of Temperatures Used in Food Storage on Duration of Heat Stress Induced Invasiveness of L. monocytogenes. Microorganisms 2019, 7, 467.

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