Next Article in Journal
Conservation Implications of Shifting Gut Microbiomes in Captive-Reared Endangered Voles Intended for Reintroduction into the Wild
Next Article in Special Issue
Thermophilic Proteins as Versatile Scaffolds for Protein Engineering
Previous Article in Journal
Gut Bacterial Communities in Geographically Distant Populations of Farmed Sea Bream (Sparus aurata) and Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)
Previous Article in Special Issue
Cellulases from Thermophiles Found by Metagenomics
Open AccessArticle

Thermostable Xylanase Production by Geobacillus sp. Strain DUSELR13, and Its Application in Ethanol Production with Lignocellulosic Biomass

1
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701, USA
2
BuG ReMeDEE Consortium, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701, USA
3
Composite and Nanocomposite Advanced Manufacturing Centre–Biomaterials (CNAM/Bio), Rapid City, SD 57701, USA
4
Department of Chemistry and Applied Biological Sciences, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Microorganisms 2018, 6(3), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms6030093
Received: 5 August 2018 / Revised: 29 August 2018 / Accepted: 31 August 2018 / Published: 5 September 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thermophiles and Thermozymes)
The aim of the current study was to optimize the production of xylanase, and its application for ethanol production using the lignocellulosic biomass. A highly thermostable crude xylanase was obtained from the Geobacillus sp. strain DUSELR13 isolated from the deep biosphere of Homestake gold mine, Lead, SD. Geobacillus sp. strain DUSELR13 produced 6 U/mL of the xylanase with the beechwood xylan. The xylanase production was improved following the optimization studies, with one factor at a time approach, from 6 U/mL to 19.8 U/mL with xylan. The statistical optimization with response surface methodology further increased the production to 31 U/mL. The characterization studies revealed that the crude xylanase complex had an optimum pH of 7.0, with a broad pH range of 5.0–9.0, and an optimum temperature of 75 °C. The ~45 kDa xylanase protein was highly thermostable with t1/2 of 48, 38, and 13 days at 50, 60, and 70 °C, respectively. The xylanase activity increased with the addition of Cu+2, Zn+2, K+, and Fe+2 at 1 mM concentration, and Ca+2, Zn+2, Mg+2, and Na+ at 10 mM concentration. The comparative analysis of the crude xylanase against its commercial counterpart Novozymes Cellic HTec and Dupont, Accellerase XY, showed that it performed better at higher temperature, hydrolyzing 65.4% of the beechwood at 75 °C. The DUSEL R13 showed the mettle to hydrolyze, and utilize the pretreated, and untreated lignocellulosic biomass: prairie cord grass (PCG), and corn stover (CS) as the substrate, and gave a maximum yield of 20.5 U/mL with the untreated PCG. When grown in co-culture with Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius, it produced 3.53 and 3.72 g/L ethanol, respectively with PCG, and CS. With these characteristics the xylanase under study could be an industrial success for the high temperature bioprocesses. View Full-Text
Keywords: Thermostable; xylanase; Geobacillus; lignocellulosic biomass; ethanol Thermostable; xylanase; Geobacillus; lignocellulosic biomass; ethanol
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

MDPI and ACS Style

Bibra, M.; Kunreddy, V.R.; Sani, R.K. Thermostable Xylanase Production by Geobacillus sp. Strain DUSELR13, and Its Application in Ethanol Production with Lignocellulosic Biomass. Microorganisms 2018, 6, 93.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop