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Open AccessArticle

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Intestinal Parasite Infections in Greek Swine Farrow-To-Finish Farms

1
Laboratory of Parasitology and Parasitic Diseases, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
2
Farm Animals Clinic, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54627 Thessaloniki, Greece
3
Laboratory of Anatomy and Physiology of Farm Animals, Department of Animal Science, School of Animal Biosciences, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Pathogens 2020, 9(7), 556; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9070556
Received: 15 June 2020 / Revised: 2 July 2020 / Accepted: 7 July 2020 / Published: 10 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Animal Pathogens)
Intestinal parasites, helminths, and protozoa challenge health and welfare of pigs and deteriorate the sustainability of swine farms leading to monetary losses. A multicentric survey was conducted for approximately one year. Overall, 1150 fecal samples were collected from eight intensive farms in Greece at regular intervals and examined by flotation and Ziehl-Neelsen techniques. Age, season, and time of last recorded antiparasitic treatment were assessed as possible risk factors using binary regression models. The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitism in pigs was 44.7%. The most frequently detected parasites in the studied population were the protozoa Balantidium coli (37.8%), followed by Entamoeba spp. (8.3%), Cystoisospora suis (6.0%), and the nematodes Ascaris suum (3.7%), Trichuris suis (2.5%), and Oesophagostomum spp. (1.4%). Distribution of intestinal parasites in different age groups was as expected. In autumn, the prevalence of Balantidium coli infection enhanced whereas the prevalence of Entamoeba spp. and Cystoisospora suis infections increased in spring. Time of last recorded antiparasitic treatment influenced Balantidium coli and Trichuris suis infection levels. Our results demonstrated that swine intestinal parasitism in intensive farms of Greece seems to be relatively common and highlighted the importance of proper laboratory examinations, as well as the need for tailored made control programs. View Full-Text
Keywords: intestinal parasites; pigs; risk factors; Greece; swine farms intestinal parasites; pigs; risk factors; Greece; swine farms
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MDPI and ACS Style

Symeonidou, I.; Tassis, P.; Gelasakis, A.Ι.; Tzika, E.D.; Papadopoulos, E. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Intestinal Parasite Infections in Greek Swine Farrow-To-Finish Farms. Pathogens 2020, 9, 556. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9070556

AMA Style

Symeonidou I, Tassis P, Gelasakis AΙ, Tzika ED, Papadopoulos E. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Intestinal Parasite Infections in Greek Swine Farrow-To-Finish Farms. Pathogens. 2020; 9(7):556. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9070556

Chicago/Turabian Style

Symeonidou, Isaia; Tassis, Panagiotis; Gelasakis, Athanasios Ι.; Tzika, Eleni D.; Papadopoulos, Elias. 2020. "Prevalence and Risk Factors of Intestinal Parasite Infections in Greek Swine Farrow-To-Finish Farms" Pathogens 9, no. 7: 556. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens9070556

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