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Article

Sparse Evidence for Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Microsporidia Infections in Humans, Domesticated Animals and Wild Nonhuman Primates Sharing a Farm–Forest Mosaic Landscape in Western Uganda

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Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford OX3 0BP, UK
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Bulindi Chimpanzee & Community Project, Hoima P.O. Box 245, Uganda
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Anicoon Vétérinaires, Ploemeur, 56260 Larmor-Plage, France
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Biology Centre, Institute of Parasitology, Czech Academy of Sciences, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
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Faculty of Agriculture, University of South Bohemia, 370 05 České Budějovice, Czech Republic
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Budongo Conservation Field Station, Masindi P.O. Box 362, Uganda
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Institute of Vertebrate Biology, Czech Academy of Sciences, 603 65 Brno, Czech Republic
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Liberec Zoo, 460 01 Liberec, Czech Republic
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Luiz Shozo Ozaki
Pathogens 2021, 10(8), 933; https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080933
Received: 9 May 2021 / Revised: 18 July 2021 / Accepted: 21 July 2021 / Published: 23 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pathogens in African Great Apes)
Zoonotic pathogen transmission is considered a leading threat to the survival of non-human primates and public health in shared landscapes. Giardia spp., Cryptosporidium spp. and Microsporidia are unicellular parasites spread by the fecal-oral route by environmentally resistant stages and can infect humans, livestock, and wildlife including non-human primates. Using immunoassay diagnostic kits and amplification/sequencing of the region of the triosephosphate isomerase, small ribosomal subunit rRNA and the internal transcribed spacer genes, we investigated Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and microsporidia infections, respectively, among humans, domesticated animals (livestock, poultry, and dogs), and wild nonhuman primates (eastern chimpanzees and black and white colobus monkeys) in Bulindi, Uganda, an area of remarkably high human–animal contact and spatial overlap. We analyzed 137 fecal samples and revealed the presence of G. intestinalis assemblage B in two human isolates, G. intestinalis assemblage E in one cow isolate, and Encephalitozoon cuniculi genotype II in two humans and one goat isolate. None of the chimpanzee and colobus monkey samples were positive for any of the screened parasites. Regular distribution of antiparasitic treatment in both humans and domestic animals in Bulindi could have reduced the occurrence of the screened parasites and decreased potential circulation of these pathogens among host species. View Full-Text
Keywords: Giardia; Cryptosporidium; microsporidia; non-human primates; humans; domestic animals; anthropogenic disturbance; coproantigen; PCR; Uganda Giardia; Cryptosporidium; microsporidia; non-human primates; humans; domestic animals; anthropogenic disturbance; coproantigen; PCR; Uganda
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cibot, M.; McLennan, M.R.; Kváč, M.; Sak, B.; Asiimwe, C.; Petrželková, K. Sparse Evidence for Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Microsporidia Infections in Humans, Domesticated Animals and Wild Nonhuman Primates Sharing a Farm–Forest Mosaic Landscape in Western Uganda. Pathogens 2021, 10, 933. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080933

AMA Style

Cibot M, McLennan MR, Kváč M, Sak B, Asiimwe C, Petrželková K. Sparse Evidence for Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Microsporidia Infections in Humans, Domesticated Animals and Wild Nonhuman Primates Sharing a Farm–Forest Mosaic Landscape in Western Uganda. Pathogens. 2021; 10(8):933. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080933

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cibot, Marie, Matthew R. McLennan, Martin Kváč, Bohumil Sak, Caroline Asiimwe, and Klára Petrželková. 2021. "Sparse Evidence for Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Microsporidia Infections in Humans, Domesticated Animals and Wild Nonhuman Primates Sharing a Farm–Forest Mosaic Landscape in Western Uganda" Pathogens 10, no. 8: 933. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens10080933

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