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Disability Ethos as Invention in the United States’ Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries

1
Department of Communication, Regis University, Denver, CO 80221, USA
2
Department of Language and Literature, Texas A & M University—Kingsville, Kingsville, TX 78363, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Humanities 2020, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010011
Received: 24 October 2019 / Revised: 19 December 2019 / Accepted: 11 January 2020 / Published: 16 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Histories of Ethos: World Perspectives on Rhetoric)
This article posits that disability activists routinely present a disability “ethos of invention” as central to the reformation of an ableist society. Dominant societal approaches to disability injustice, such as rehabilitation, accessibility, and inclusion, may touch upon the concept of invention; but, with ethotic discourse, we emphasize disability as generative and adept at producing new ways of knowing and being in the world. We identify an “ethos of invention” as driving early resistance to socially constructed “normalcy”, leading the push for cross-disability alliances to incorporate intersectional experiences and propelling the discursive move from inclusion to social justice. Through our partial re-telling of disability rights history, we articulate invention as central to it and supporting its aims to affirm disability culture, reform society through disabled perspectives and values, and promote people with disabilities’ full participation in society. View Full-Text
Keywords: disability; invention; ethos; rehabilitation; accessibility; inclusion; intersectionality; cross-disability identity disability; invention; ethos; rehabilitation; accessibility; inclusion; intersectionality; cross-disability identity
MDPI and ACS Style

Stones, E.D.; Meyer, C.A. Disability Ethos as Invention in the United States’ Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries. Humanities 2020, 9, 11. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010011

AMA Style

Stones ED, Meyer CA. Disability Ethos as Invention in the United States’ Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries. Humanities. 2020; 9(1):11. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010011

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stones, Emily D., and Craig A. Meyer 2020. "Disability Ethos as Invention in the United States’ Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries" Humanities 9, no. 1: 11. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010011

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