Next Article in Journal
Disability Ethos as Invention in the United States’ Twentieth and Early Twenty-First Centuries
Next Article in Special Issue
Pirates and Publicity: The Making and Unmaking of Early Modern Pirates in English and Scottish Popular Print
Previous Article in Journal
Why the West Could Not Hear Beale Street: Baldwin’s World-Sense of Female Sexuality
Previous Article in Special Issue
Slippery Pirates: Generic Conventions and Discursive Instability in John Fletcher and Philip Massinger’s Pirate Plays
Article

From Braemar to Hollywood: The American Appropriation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Pirates

by 1,* and 2,*
1
English Department, Chaminade University, Honolulu, HI 96816, USA
2
Rare Book School, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Humanities 2020, 9(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010010
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 22 December 2019 / Accepted: 24 December 2019 / Published: 11 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pirates in English Literature)
The pirate tropes that pervade popular culture today can be traced in large part to Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1883 novel, Treasure Island. However, it is the novel’s afterlife on film that has generated fictional pirates as we now understand them. By tracing the transformation of the author’s pirate captain, Long John Silver, from N. C. Wyeth’s illustrations (1911) through the cinematic performances of Wallace Beery (1934) and Robert Newton (1950), this paper demonstrates that the films have created a quintessentially “American pirate”—a figure that has necessarily evolved in response to differences in medium, the performances of the leading actors, and filmgoers’ expectations. Comparing depictions of Silver’s dress, physique, and speech patterns, his role vis-à-vis Jim Hawkins, each adaptation’s narrative point of view, and Silver’s departure at the end of the films reveals that while the Silver of the silver screen may appear to represent a significant departure from the text, he embodies a nuanced reworking of and testament to the author’s original. View Full-Text
Keywords: Robert Louis Stevenson; Treasure Island; pirate; film; illustration Robert Louis Stevenson; Treasure Island; pirate; film; illustration
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Hill, R.J.; Eidam, L. From Braemar to Hollywood: The American Appropriation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Pirates. Humanities 2020, 9, 10. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010010

AMA Style

Hill RJ, Eidam L. From Braemar to Hollywood: The American Appropriation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Pirates. Humanities. 2020; 9(1):10. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010010

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hill, Richard J.; Eidam, Laura. 2020. "From Braemar to Hollywood: The American Appropriation of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Pirates" Humanities 9, no. 1: 10. https://doi.org/10.3390/h9010010

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop