Next Article in Journal
Response to Jewell, Evan. (Re)moving the Masses: Colonisation as Domestic Displacement in the Roman Republic. Humanities 2019, 8, 66
Previous Article in Journal
“Always Trembling on the Brink of Poetry”: Katherine Mansfield, Poet
Previous Article in Special Issue
A Dialogue on the Constructions of GLBT and Queer Ethos: “I Belong to a Culture That Includes …”
Open AccessArticle

Islamic Ethos: Examining Sources of Authority

Center for Contemporary and Creative Writing, Goucher College, Baltimore, MD 21204, USA
Humanities 2019, 8(4), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/h8040170
Received: 2 September 2019 / Revised: 25 September 2019 / Accepted: 17 October 2019 / Published: 24 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Histories of Ethos: World Perspectives on Rhetoric)
This paper investigates the construction of Islamic ethos in the early Islamic period, highlighting what constitutes the guiding principles of its authority. As a religion that is currently subject to many ugly charges, a careful examination of its core historic values provides a counternarrative to the distorted ideology perpetuated by extremists such as The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS), as well as to the Islamophobic and anti-Muslim racist discourse circulating in the West. The counternarrative presented here serves scholars of ethos whose expertise lies elsewhere than in religious studies. While providing this historical narrative, I highlight how Islamic ethos is derived from multiple sources of religious and cultural/communal authority, mainly from The Qur’an (the holy book of Muslims); the Sunnah (the Prophet Muḥammad’s example, deeds, and customs); and ijtihad (the interpretations and deductions of Muslim religious leaders). Tracing the construction of Islamic ethos through the creation of the Muslim community (Ummah) in 622 CE and the establishment of the Caliphate in 632 CE reveals guiding principles of conduct that are, in contrast to the discourses mentioned above, realistic, practical, and adaptable to current global needs and exigencies. View Full-Text
Keywords: Islamic ethos; nonwestern rhetorics; authority; Islamophobia; The Qur’an; Sunnah; Ijtihad; Islamic State; Muslim community (Ummah); Caliphate Islamic ethos; nonwestern rhetorics; authority; Islamophobia; The Qur’an; Sunnah; Ijtihad; Islamic State; Muslim community (Ummah); Caliphate
MDPI and ACS Style

Oweidat, L. Islamic Ethos: Examining Sources of Authority. Humanities 2019, 8, 170.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop