Next Article in Journal
Disney ‘World’: The Westernization of World Music in EPCOT’s “IllumiNations: Reflections of Earth”
Previous Article in Journal
Inequalities in US Child Protection: The Case of Sex Trafficked Youth
Previous Article in Special Issue
Digital Ecologies of Youth Mental Health: Apps, Therapeutic Publics and Pedagogy as Affective Arrangements
Article Menu

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Soc. Sci. 2018, 7(8), 137; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci7080137

Young People’s Perspectives on and Experiences of Health-Related Social Media, Apps, and Wearable Health Devices

1
School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
2
PVC-Education, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 9 July 2018 / Revised: 2 August 2018 / Accepted: 2 August 2018 / Published: 13 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pedagogies of Health: The Role of Technology)
Full-Text   |   PDF [494 KB, uploaded 17 August 2018]   |  

Abstract

It has been reported from numerous international and socio-economic contexts that young people are becoming increasingly interested in and/or using social media, apps, and wearable devices for their health. Yet, there are few robust empirical accounts on the types of health-related information young people find, select, and use, the reasons for their choices, and how young people use these technologies in a way that influences their health-related knowledge and behaviors. This paper synthesizes findings from three separate projects that investigated over 1600 young people’s (age 13–19) perspectives on and experiences of health-related social media, apps, and wearable health devices. The findings show that young people are both critical and vulnerable users and generators of digital health technologies. Many young people experience a range of positive benefits for their physical activity, diet/nutritional, and body image related behaviors. Yet there are a number of risks, and young people report on the power of digital health technologies to shape, influence, and change their health-related behaviors. The paper concludes by providing new and evidence-based direction and guidance on how relevant adults (including teachers, parents/guardians, health professionals/practitioners, policy-makers, and researchers) can better understand and support young people’s engagement with digital health technologies. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical activity; diet; nutrition; body image; pedagogy; adolescents physical activity; diet; nutrition; body image; pedagogy; adolescents
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Goodyear, V.A.; Armour, K.M. Young People’s Perspectives on and Experiences of Health-Related Social Media, Apps, and Wearable Health Devices. Soc. Sci. 2018, 7, 137.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Soc. Sci. EISSN 2076-0760 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top