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Article

Achieving Juvenile Justice through Abolition: A Critical Review of Social Work’s Role in Shaping the Juvenile Legal System and Steps toward Achieving an Antiracist Future

Crown Family School of Social Work, Policy, and Practice, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA
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Academic Editors: Tina Freiburger and Kareem Jordan
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(6), 211; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060211
Received: 1 May 2021 / Revised: 29 May 2021 / Accepted: 2 June 2021 / Published: 5 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Racial and Ethnic Issues in the Criminal Justice System)
The first juvenile court was created in 1899 with the help of social workers who conceptualized their actions as progressive. Youth were deemed inculpable for certain actions since, cognitively, their brains were not as developed as those of adults. Thus, separate measures were created to rehabilitate youth who exhibited delinquent and deviant behavior. Over one hundred years later, we have a system that disproportionately arrests, confines, and displaces Black youth. This paper critiques social work’s role in helping develop the first juvenile courts, while highlighting the failures of the current juvenile legal system. We then use P.I.C. abolition as a theoretical framework to offer guidance on how social work can once again assist in the transformation of the juvenile legal system as a means toward achieving true justice. View Full-Text
Keywords: juvenile justice; abolition; antiracism; social work history; juvenile courts juvenile justice; abolition; antiracism; social work history; juvenile courts
MDPI and ACS Style

Washington, D.M.; Harper, T.; Hill, A.B.; Kern, L.J. Achieving Juvenile Justice through Abolition: A Critical Review of Social Work’s Role in Shaping the Juvenile Legal System and Steps toward Achieving an Antiracist Future. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060211

AMA Style

Washington DM, Harper T, Hill AB, Kern LJ. Achieving Juvenile Justice through Abolition: A Critical Review of Social Work’s Role in Shaping the Juvenile Legal System and Steps toward Achieving an Antiracist Future. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(6):211. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060211

Chicago/Turabian Style

Washington, Durrell M., Toyan Harper, Alizé B. Hill, and Lester J. Kern. 2021. "Achieving Juvenile Justice through Abolition: A Critical Review of Social Work’s Role in Shaping the Juvenile Legal System and Steps toward Achieving an Antiracist Future" Social Sciences 10, no. 6: 211. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060211

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