Next Article in Journal
The Long Shadow of Peers: Adolescent Networks and Young Adult Mental Health
Next Article in Special Issue
“You Know Baseball? 3 Strikes”: Understanding Racial Disparity with Mixed Methods for Probation Review Hearings
Previous Article in Journal
Message Sidedness Effects in Advertising: The Role of Yin-Yang Balancing Theory
Previous Article in Special Issue
Achieving Juvenile Justice through Abolition: A Critical Review of Social Work’s Role in Shaping the Juvenile Legal System and Steps toward Achieving an Antiracist Future
Article

Police Stop and Frisk and the Impact of Race: A Focal Concerns Theory Approach

1
Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology, Ball State University, 2000 W University Ave., Muncie, IN 47306, USA
2
Department of Criminal Justice, University of Louisville, 2301 S 3rd St., Louisville, KY 40292, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tina Freiburger and Kareem Jordan
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(6), 230; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060230
Received: 29 April 2021 / Revised: 14 June 2021 / Accepted: 14 June 2021 / Published: 16 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Racial and Ethnic Issues in the Criminal Justice System)
The findings of this study outline the racial differences in stop and frisk decisions by Illinois officers in consent searches and those based upon reasonable suspicion within the context of the elements of focal concerns theory. The analysis for this study was performed using propensity score matching (PSM) and allowed the researchers to create a quasi-experimental design to examine the race of the citizen and police decision making. According to our analysis of official Illinois law enforcement data, Black citizens, particularly males, were less likely to give their consent to a stop and frisk search. Black male citizens were also more likely to be stopped and searched due to an assessment of reasonable suspicion by the officer. Elements of focal concerns theory were also factors in pedestrian stops under conditions of consent and reasonable suspicion. Citizens judged as blameworthy were more likely to be stopped and frisked under conditions of consent and reasonable suspicion. The effect of a verbal threat and the officer’s prior knowledge about the citizen had even more significant impacts. View Full-Text
Keywords: stop and frisk; racial profiling; propensity score matching; focal concerns theory stop and frisk; racial profiling; propensity score matching; focal concerns theory
MDPI and ACS Style

Vito, A.; Higgins, G.; Vito, G. Police Stop and Frisk and the Impact of Race: A Focal Concerns Theory Approach. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 230. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060230

AMA Style

Vito A, Higgins G, Vito G. Police Stop and Frisk and the Impact of Race: A Focal Concerns Theory Approach. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(6):230. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060230

Chicago/Turabian Style

Vito, Anthony, George Higgins, and Gennaro Vito. 2021. "Police Stop and Frisk and the Impact of Race: A Focal Concerns Theory Approach" Social Sciences 10, no. 6: 230. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10060230

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop