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Article

Dismantling the Deadlock: Australian Muslim Women’s Fightback against the Rise of Right-Wing Media

Department of Communication, University of Technology Sydney, Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia
Academic Editors: Nigel Parton, Linda Briskman and Lucy Fiske
Soc. Sci. 2021, 10(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10020071
Received: 27 January 2021 / Revised: 9 February 2021 / Accepted: 10 February 2021 / Published: 13 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Rights and Displaced People in Exceptional Times)
In Australia, as in other multicultural countries, the global Islamophobic discourse linking Muslims to terrorists to refugees results in the belief of an “enemy within”, which fractures the public sphere. Muslim minorities learn to distrust mainstream media as the global discourse manifests in localised right-wing discussion. This fracturing was further compounded in 2020 with increased media concentration and polarisation. In response, 12 young Australian Muslim women opened themselves up to four journalists working for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). They engaged in critical journalism research called Frame Reflection Interviews (FRIs). The process gave journalists important knowledge around the power dynamics of Islamophobia and empowered participants to help shape new media discourses tackling Islamophobia. This paper proposes that the FRIs are one method to rebuild trust in journalism while redistributing risk towards the journalists. These steps are necessary to build a normatively cosmopolitan global public sphere capable of breaking the discursive link between refugees and terrorism and fighting back against the rise of the far right. View Full-Text
Keywords: Islamophobia; journalism; public sphere; trust Islamophobia; journalism; public sphere; trust
MDPI and ACS Style

Giotis, C. Dismantling the Deadlock: Australian Muslim Women’s Fightback against the Rise of Right-Wing Media. Soc. Sci. 2021, 10, 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10020071

AMA Style

Giotis C. Dismantling the Deadlock: Australian Muslim Women’s Fightback against the Rise of Right-Wing Media. Social Sciences. 2021; 10(2):71. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10020071

Chicago/Turabian Style

Giotis, Chrisanthi. 2021. "Dismantling the Deadlock: Australian Muslim Women’s Fightback against the Rise of Right-Wing Media" Social Sciences 10, no. 2: 71. https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci10020071

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